tumor

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tu·mor

 (to͞o′mər, tyo͞o′-)
n.
1. An abnormal growth of tissue resulting from uncontrolled, progressive multiplication of cells and serving no physiological function; a neoplasm.
2. A swollen part; a swelling: a plant tumor.

[Middle English tumour, from Latin tumor, from tumēre, to swell; see teuə- in Indo-European roots.]

tu′mor·al, tu′mor·ous adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

tu•mor

(ˈtu mər, ˈtyu-)

n.
1. a swollen part; swelling; protuberance.
2. an uncontrolled, abnormal, circumscribed growth of cells in any animal or plant tissue; neoplasm.
Also, esp. Brit.,tu′mour.
[1535–45; < Latin: a swelling =tum(ēre) to swell + -or -or1]
tu′mor•ous, tu′mor•al, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

tu·mor

(to͞o′mər)
An abnormal growth of tissue resulting from uncontrolled growth of cells and serving no function within the body; a cancerous growth. Tumors can be benign (unlikely to spread to other body parts) or malignant (likely to spread). See Note at cancer.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tumor - an abnormal new mass of tissue that serves no purposetumor - an abnormal new mass of tissue that serves no purpose
growth - (pathology) an abnormal proliferation of tissue (as in a tumor)
acanthoma, skin tumor - a neoplasm originating in the epidermis
angioma - a tumor consisting of a mass of blood or lymphatic vessels
blastocytoma, blastoma, embryonal carcinosarcoma - a tumor composed of immature undifferentiated cells
brain tumor, brain tumour - a tumor in the brain
carcinoid - a small tumor (benign or malignant) arising from the mucosa of the gastrointestinal tract; usually associated with excessive secretion of serotonin
celioma - an abdominal tumor
granuloma - a tumor composed of granulation tissue resulting from injury or inflammation or infection
adipose tumor, lipoma - a tumor consisting of fatty tissue
malignant neoplasm, malignant tumor, metastatic tumor - a tumor that is malignant and tends to spread to other parts of the body
meningioma - a tumor arising in the meninges which surround the brain and spinal cord; usually slow growing and sometimes malignant
neurilemoma, neurofibroma - tumor of the fibrous covering of a peripheral nerve
neuroma - any tumor derived from cells of the nervous system
phaeochromocytoma, pheochromocytoma - a vascular tumor of the adrenal gland; hypersecretion of epinephrine results in intermittent or sustained hypertension
pinealoma - tumor of the pineal gland
plasmacytoma - neoplasm of plasma cells (usually in bone marrow)
psammoma, sand tumor - a tumor derived from fibrous tissue of the meninges or choroid plexus or certain other structures associated with the brain; characterized by sandlike particles
teratoma - a tumor consisting of a mixture of tissues not normally found at that site
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
nádor
svulst
kasvain
tumor
腫瘍
종양
nádor
tumor
tumör
เนื้องอก
khối u

tumor

وَرَم nádor svulst Tumor όγκος tumor kasvain tumeur tumor tumore 腫瘍 종양 tumor svulst guz tumor опухоль tumör เนื้องอก ur khối u 肿瘤
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009

tu·mor

n. bulto o hinchazón; tumor.
crecimiento espontáneo de tejido nuevo en masa que no tiene propósito fisiológico alguno;
diffuse ______ difuso;
inflammatory ______ inflamatorio;
medullary ______ medular;
necrotic ______ necrótico;
nonsolid ______ no sólido;
radioresistant ______ radiorresistente;
radiosensitive ______ radiosensitivo;
scirrhous ______ escirroso;
undifferentiated ______ no diferenciado.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

tumor

adj tumoral; n tumor m; benign — tumor benigno; brain — tumor cerebral; desmoid — tumor desmoide; malignant — tumor maligno; Wilms' — tumor de Wilms
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The present invention also provides a method for evaluating the ability of an agent to inhibit tumor invasion in a local cellular environment which comprises: (a) admixing with cell culture media an effective amount of the agent; (b) contacting a tumor cell in cell culture with the media from step (a); (c) determining the amount of spreading of the tumor cell culture, and (d) comparing the amount of spreading of the tumor cell culture determined in step (c) with the amount determined in the absence of the agent, thus evaluating the ability of the agent to inhibit tumor invasion in the local cellular environment.
A poster entitled, "Evaluation of the efficacy of satraplatin (JM216) and its major metabolite JM118 in drug resistant cells and in combination with docetaxel" (Abstract #1387), reviewed the results of a study designed to explore the activity of satraplatin in several drug-resistant human tumor cell lines, including those resistant to taxanes, mitoxantrone, etoposide, camptothecin and cisplatin.
A rich vascular network invests the tumor cell nests (figure 1, A).
One study tested an injected adenovirus that was engineered to replicate only when inside prostate tumor cells. Once inside a prostate tumor cell, the virus switches on and begins to replicate.
To compare the tumor cell count detected in different samples, the relative tumor cell count per 106 cells examined was calculated.
"By learning how normal and mutant p53 interact with DNA," Bargonetti says, "we may be able to target cancer drugs to the precise locations needed to prevent or reverse tumor cell growth."
What's interesting is that TNF does not kill the astrocyte (as it does a tumor cell); it changes the function of the astrocyte." Since astrocytes are vital to the formation of scars in the brain and spinal cord in MS, learning that TNF can alter astrocyte function is extremely important in learning how scarring is caused and may be prevented.
In the first step, the ligand binds to the tumor-specific receptor on the surface of a tumor cell. The tumor cell then folds its membrane in to enclose the receptor and prodrug in a bubble and bring them into the cell (receptor-mediated endocytosis).
RESULTS: We detected much higher concentrations of homocysteine (Hcy) released by the tumor cells. However, much less difference was found between normal and tumor cell lines when Hcy concentration was expressed per the same number of cells.
The company said the late stage clinical study of its CellSearch Circulating Tumor Cell Kit found that circulating tumor cells levels measured 3-5 weeks after chemotherapy was started predict overall survival in prostate cancer patients whose disease had spread to other parts of the body.
The current "gold standard" in circulating tumor cell detection relies on extracting tissue samples from patients' bone marrow for testing.
Ultrastructural examination of the tumor cell was also performed with materials obtained from tissue fixed in formalin.