tumult

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tu·mult

 (to͞o′mŭlt′, tyo͞o′-)
n.
1. A great noise, as of a crowd: had to shout over the tumult in the cafeteria.
2. A disorderly commotion or disturbance: "shops at this hour ... the scene of mercantile tumult" (Nicholas Clapp).
3. A state of agitation of the mind or emotions: "I spend much time in a tumult of anger and disbelief" (Scott Turow).

[Middle English tumulte, from Latin tumultus.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

tumult

(ˈtjuːmʌlt)
n
1. a loud confused noise, as of a crowd; commotion
2. violent agitation or disturbance
3. great emotional or mental agitation
[C15: from Latin tumultus, from tumēre to swell up]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

tu•mult

(ˈtu mʌlt, -məlt, ˈtyu-)

n.
1. violent and noisy commotion or disturbance of a crowd or mob; uproar.
2. a general outbreak, riot, uprising, or other disorder.
3. highly distressing agitation of mind or feeling; turbulent mental or emotional disturbance.
[1375–1425; late Middle English tumult(e) < Latin tumultus an uproar, akin to tumēre to swell]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Tumult

 a disorderly mob; a violent commotion.
Examples: tumult of grief and indignation, 1844; of joys, 1777; of passions, 1711; of spirits.
Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tumult - a state of commotion and noise and confusiontumult - a state of commotion and noise and confusion
commotion, hoo-ha, hoo-hah, hurly burly, kerfuffle, to-do, disruption, disturbance, flutter - a disorderly outburst or tumult; "they were amazed by the furious disturbance they had caused"
combustion - a state of violent disturbance and excitement; "combustion grew until revolt was unavoidable"
2.tumult - violent agitationtumult - violent agitation      
agitation - the feeling of being agitated; not calm
3.tumult - the act of making a noisy disturbancetumult - the act of making a noisy disturbance
disturbance - the act of disturbing something or someone; setting something in motion
ado, bustle, flurry, hustle, stir, fuss - a rapid active commotion
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

tumult

noun
2. clamour, row, outbreak, racket, din, uproar, fracas, commotion, pandemonium, babel, hubbub, hullabaloo Round one ended to a tumult of whistles, screams and shouts.
clamour peace, quiet, silence, calm, hush, serenity, stillness, repose
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

tumult

noun
1. Sounds or a sound, especially when loud, confused, or disagreeable:
2. A quarrel, fight, or disturbance marked by very noisy, disorderly, and often violent behavior:
Informal: fracas.
Slang: rumble.
3. An interruption of regular procedure or of public peace:
Informal: flap, to-do.
4. A state of discomposure:
Informal: lather, stew.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
ضَجَّه
rámusruch
tumult
hávaîi, læti
kņadatroksnis

tumult

[ˈtjuːmʌlt] N (= uproar) → tumulto m
to be in a tumult [person] → estar agitado or alborotado
her emotions were in a tumulttenía un conflicto emocional
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

tumult

[ˈtjuːmʌlt] ntumulte m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

tumult

n
(= uproar)Tumult m; the tumult of battledas Schlachtgetümmel
(emotional) his mind was in a tumultsein Inneres befand sich in Aufruhr; a tumult of emotion/weepingein Gefühls-/Tränenausbruch m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

tumult

[ˈtjuːmʌlt] ntumulto
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

tumult

(ˈtjuːmalt) noun
a great noise (usually made by a crowd). He could hear a great tumult in the street.
tuˈmultuous (-tʃuəs) adjective
with great noise or confusion. The crowd gave him a tumultuous welcome; tumultuous applause.
tuˈmultuously adverb
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
I do not, of course, mean that there are not battles, conspiracies, tumults, factions, and all those other phenomena which are supposed to make History interesting; nor would I deny that the strange mixture of the problems of life and the problems of Mathematics, continually inducing conjecture and giving the opportunity of immediate verification, imparts to our existence a zest which you in Spaceland can hardly comprehend.
And if his successors had been united they would have enjoyed it securely and at their ease, for there were no tumults raised in the kingdom except those they provoked themselves.
They could not be clear for the Union, yet they saw death at the door in its breaking off--death to their liberty, to their religion, and to their country." Better than any other he gives a picture of the "infinite struggles, clamor, railing, and tumult of party." Let me give, in his own words, a description of a riot in the streets of Edinburgh:--
Of late, eternal Condor years So shake the very Heaven on high With tumult as they thunder by, I have no time for idle cares Through gazing on the unquiet sky.
On the contrary, when a set of grave men and philosophers are disputing; when wisdom herself may in a manner be considered as present, and administering arguments to the disputants; should a tumult arise among the mob, or should one scold, who is herself equal in noise to a mighty mob, appear among the said philosophers; their disputes cease in a moment, wisdom no longer performs her ministerial office, and the attention of every one is immediately attracted by the scold alone.
What a tumult of emotions rushed upon me at this startling intelligence!
In the midst of this tumult the voice of the president was heard to exclaim, -- "Are you playing with justice, accused, and do you dare set your fellow-citizens an example of disorder which even in these times his never been equalled?"
A great tumult arose, in the midst of which even the noise of thunder could not have been heard.
No sooner has he gone than Creon enters with an armed guard who seize Antigone and carry her off (Ismene, the other sister, they have already captured) and he is about to lay hands on Oedipus, when Theseus, who has heard the tumult, hurries up and, upbraiding Creon for his lawless act, threatens to detain him till he has shown where the captives are and restored them.
I heard a yelling from many throats, a tumult of exultant cries passing down towards the beach, whooping and howling, and excited shrieks that seemed to come to a stop near the water's edge.