tungstate

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Related to tungstates: Calcium tungstate

tung·state

 (tŭng′stāt′)
n.
A salt of tungstic acid.

tungstate

(ˈtʌŋsteɪt)
n
(Elements & Compounds) a salt of tungstic acid
[C20: from tungst(en) + -ate1]

tung•state

(ˈtʌŋ steɪt)

n.
a salt of any tungstic acid.
[1790–1800]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tungstate - a salt of tungstic acid
salt - a compound formed by replacing hydrogen in an acid by a metal (or a radical that acts like a metal)
References in periodicals archive ?
Metal tungstates have attracted much attention due to their important applications as photoluminescent materials [1-3], microwave applications [4, 5], sensors [6], optical devices [7], photocatalysts [8], supercapacitors [9, 10] and others [11, 12].
(1) Low-temperature sulfur incrustations from Ebeko volcano contain appreciable amounts of trace elements stored in rock particles, metal sulfides (e.g., argentite ([Ag.sub.2]S), covellite (CuS), cadmoindite (Cd[In.sub.2][S.sub.4]), famatinite ([Cu.sub.3]Sb[S.sub.4])), chlorides (cotunnite (Pb[Cl.sub.2])), sulfates (anhydrite (CaS[O.sub.4]), alunite [(K[Al.sub.3](S[O.sub.4]).sub.2][(OH).sub.6]), anglesite (PbS[O.sub.4]), barite (BaS[O.sub.4])), and tungstates (scheelite (CaW[O.sub.4])).
Klevtsov, "A correlation between the structure and some physical properties of binary molybdates (Tungstates) of uni- and bivalent metals," Journal of Structural Chemistry, vol.
Although several compounds have been reported to act as good corrosion inhibitors for steel in neutral media (e.g., molybdates, tungstates, polyphosphate, and phosphonate) [1-5], the use of carboxylic acid derivatives has been attractive since they are environmentally friendly and can be derived from fatty acids extracted from vegetable oils [6, 7].
Nitrates, molybdates, and tungstates also have been used.
The crystalline mineral matter typically comprised of oxides-hydroxides, sulphides-sulphosalts, sulphates, silicates, carbonates, phosphates, vanadates, tungstates, chlorides, native elements, and other mineral classes (Ural, 2007; Vassilev and Vassileva, 1996).
[24] have carried out detailed study on thermal expansion of some other molybdates and tungstates such as [Gd.sub.2][Mo.sub.3][O.sub.12] and [Gd.sub.2][W.sub.3][O.sub.12].
Pollnau, "Integrated lasers in crystalline double tungstates with focusedion-beam nanostructured photonic cavities," Laser Physics Letters, vol.
Mihokova et al., "Excitonic emission of scheelite tungstates AW[O.sub.4] (A = Pb, Ca, Ba, Sr)," Journal of Luminescence, vol.
Fuks, "New cadmium and rare earth metal tungstates with the scheelite type structure," Journal of Rare Earths, vol.
Nevertheless, the so-called 'one-component' materials - such as manganese antiperovskites, zirconium vanadates, and hafnium tungstates - exhibiting negligible thermal expansion offer a promising route towards achieving this goal.
The oxidizing agents can be peroxides, superoxides, permanganates, tungstates, or molybdates.