tunicate


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Related to tunicate: amphioxus

tu·ni·cate

 (to͞o′nĭ-kĭt, -kāt′, tyo͞o′-)
n.
Any of various chordate marine animals of the subphylum Urochordata (or Tunicata), having a cylindrical or globular body enclosed in a tough outer covering and a notochord in the larval stage, and including the sea squirts and salps.
adj.
1. Of or relating to the tunicates.
2. Anatomy Having a tunic.
3. Botany Having a tunic, as the bulb of an onion.

[Latin tunicātus, past participle of tunicāre, to clothe with a tunic, from tunica, tunic; see tunic.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

tunicate

(ˈtjuːnɪkɪt; -ˌkeɪt)
n
(Animals) any minute primitive marine chordate animal of the subphylum Tunicata (or Urochordata, Urochorda). The adults have a saclike unsegmented body enclosed in a cellulose-like outer covering (tunic) and only the larval forms have a notochord: includes the sea squirts. See also ascidian
adj
1. (Animals) of, relating to, or belonging to the subphylum Tunicata
2. (Botany) (esp of a bulb) having or consisting of concentric layers of tissue
[C18: from Latin tunicātus clad in a tunic]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

tu•ni•cate

(ˈtu nɪ kɪt, -ˌkeɪt, ˈtyu-)

n.
1. any marine chordate of the subphylum Tunicata (or Urochordata), having a saclike body enclosed in a thick membrane or tunic: includes ascidians and salps.
adj.
2. (esp. of the Tunicata) having a tunic or covering.
3. of or pertaining to the tunicates.
4. Bot. having or consisting of a series of concentric layers, as a bulb.
Also, tu′ni•cat`ed.
[1615–25; < New Latin, Latin tunicātus wearing a tunic. See tunic, -ate1]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

tu·ni·cate

(to͞o′nĭ-kĭt)
Any of various primitive marine chordate animals having a rounded or cylindrical body that is enclosed in a tough outer covering. Tunicates start out life as free-swimming tadpole-like animals with a notochord (a primitive backbone), but many, such as the sea squirts, lose the notochord and most of their nervous system as adults and become fixed to rocks or other objects.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tunicate - primitive marine animal having a saclike unsegmented body and a urochord that is conspicuous in the larvatunicate - primitive marine animal having a saclike unsegmented body and a urochord that is conspicuous in the larva
chordate - any animal of the phylum Chordata having a notochord or spinal column
ascidian - minute sedentary marine invertebrate having a saclike body with siphons through which water enters and leaves
salp, salpa - minute floating marine tunicate having a transparent body with an opening at each end
doliolum - free-swimming oceanic tunicate with a barrel-shaped transparent body
larvacean - any member of the class Larvacea
appendicularia - free-swimming tadpole-shaped pelagic tunicate resembling larvae of other tunicates
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
tunicier
References in classic literature ?
Among the lower animals, up even to those first cousins of the vertebrated animals, the Tunicates, the two processes occur side by side, but finally the sexual method superseded its competitor altogether.
Small postmetamorphic locos have also been found associated with intertidal aggregations of the tunicate Pyura chilensis and Pyura praeputialis (Manriquez & Castilla unpublished data, Fig.
Elastic modulus of single cellulose microfibrils from tunicate measured by atomic force microscopy.
These nanocrystals can be isolated from a variety of sources such as cotton, wood pulp, tunicate, or bacteria usually by acid hydrolysis [17].
The role of blood cells in the process of asexual reproduction in the tunicate Perophora viridis.
Dlugosch and Parker (2008) analyzed data from 80 species in the literature covering 18 plants, 2 fungi, and 60 animals (including 7 birds, 6 reptiles, 8 fish, 3 amphibians, 8 mammals, 13 insects, 4 crustaceans, 6 mollusks, 3 annelids, 1 cnidarian, and 1 tunicate) and showed that, in introduced populations, there was an average reduction of 15.5% in allelic richness and a decrease of 18.7% in average heterozygosity compared to the original population.
However, there are some limitations for the tunicate class as they exist in many different colors and morphologies.
In the following sections, genes will be named according to the recent guideline for the nomenclature of tunicate genes.
Zhang, "An Early Cambrian Tunicate from China," Nature 411 (2001): 472-3.
And it was volunteers in a community-based monitoring program in Sitka who discovered one of the most dangerous of Alaska's known marine invasive species, the glove leather tunicate (Didemnum vexillum).