tunicate


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Related to tunicate: amphioxus

tu·ni·cate

 (to͞o′nĭ-kĭt, -kāt′, tyo͞o′-)
n.
Any of various chordate marine animals of the subphylum Urochordata (or Tunicata), having a cylindrical or globular body enclosed in a tough outer covering and a notochord in the larval stage, and including the sea squirts and salps.
adj.
1. Of or relating to the tunicates.
2. Anatomy Having a tunic.
3. Botany Having a tunic, as the bulb of an onion.

[Latin tunicātus, past participle of tunicāre, to clothe with a tunic, from tunica, tunic; see tunic.]

tunicate

(ˈtjuːnɪkɪt; -ˌkeɪt)
n
(Animals) any minute primitive marine chordate animal of the subphylum Tunicata (or Urochordata, Urochorda). The adults have a saclike unsegmented body enclosed in a cellulose-like outer covering (tunic) and only the larval forms have a notochord: includes the sea squirts. See also ascidian
adj
1. (Animals) of, relating to, or belonging to the subphylum Tunicata
2. (Botany) (esp of a bulb) having or consisting of concentric layers of tissue
[C18: from Latin tunicātus clad in a tunic]

tu•ni•cate

(ˈtu nɪ kɪt, -ˌkeɪt, ˈtyu-)

n.
1. any marine chordate of the subphylum Tunicata (or Urochordata), having a saclike body enclosed in a thick membrane or tunic: includes ascidians and salps.
adj.
2. (esp. of the Tunicata) having a tunic or covering.
3. of or pertaining to the tunicates.
4. Bot. having or consisting of a series of concentric layers, as a bulb.
Also, tu′ni•cat`ed.
[1615–25; < New Latin, Latin tunicātus wearing a tunic. See tunic, -ate1]

tu·ni·cate

(to͞o′nĭ-kĭt)
Any of various primitive marine chordate animals having a rounded or cylindrical body that is enclosed in a tough outer covering. Tunicates start out life as free-swimming tadpole-like animals with a notochord (a primitive backbone), but many, such as the sea squirts, lose the notochord and most of their nervous system as adults and become fixed to rocks or other objects.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tunicate - primitive marine animal having a saclike unsegmented body and a urochord that is conspicuous in the larvatunicate - primitive marine animal having a saclike unsegmented body and a urochord that is conspicuous in the larva
chordate - any animal of the phylum Chordata having a notochord or spinal column
ascidian - minute sedentary marine invertebrate having a saclike body with siphons through which water enters and leaves
salp, salpa - minute floating marine tunicate having a transparent body with an opening at each end
doliolum - free-swimming oceanic tunicate with a barrel-shaped transparent body
larvacean - any member of the class Larvacea
appendicularia - free-swimming tadpole-shaped pelagic tunicate resembling larvae of other tunicates
Translations
tunicier
References in classic literature ?
Among the lower animals, up even to those first cousins of the vertebrated animals, the Tunicates, the two processes occur side by side, but finally the sexual method superseded its competitor altogether.
The role of blood cells in the process of asexual reproduction in the tunicate Perophora viridis.
In the following sections, genes will be named according to the recent guideline for the nomenclature of tunicate genes.
A likely tunicate has been described from the Chengjiang.
And it was volunteers in a community-based monitoring program in Sitka who discovered one of the most dangerous of Alaska's known marine invasive species, the glove leather tunicate (Didemnum vexillum).
The tunicate is a spineless marine animal that's better known by another name --sea squirt, which sounds like a cute little creature that might be the best friend of a cartoon mermaid.
Antifungal activity of synthetic peptide derived from halocidin, antimicrobial peptide from the tunicate, Halocynthia aurantium.
Question for later: What modifications do you think the predator tunicate that we saw in class a few weeks ago has for eating prey instead of filter feeding?
The genome of the tunicate Oikopleura dioica contains roughly 18,000 genes, nearly as many as the human genome's 22,000 or so, but with the genes in a completely different order and less DNA stuffed between them, an international team reported online November 18 in Science.