tunnel effect


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tunnel effect

n
(General Physics) physics the phenomenon in which an object, usually an elementary particle, tunnels through a potential barrier even though it does not have sufficient energy to surmount the barrier. It is explained by wave mechanics and is the cause of alpha decay, field emission, and certain conduction processes in semiconductors
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| As gaps at the bottom of hedgerows create a wind tunnel effect, consider laying your hedges - Lantra has courses.
Given that her once bonnie face was already beginning to head towards that weird wind tunnel effect after previous ops, I dread to think what she'll look like when the stitches come out.
Speaking about the conditions she saw on Wednesday, Lindsay added: "Greatham has a bit of a tunnel effect anyway, the wind was just wild."
Santoni call this "the tunnel effect," arguing that 'streets kill." The 'tunnel effect' has a particularly strong psychological effect on individual soldiers, who suddenly feel that they could be an easy target at any moment.
Comparing with the PA, the most prominent advantage is that our algorithm can avoid the "tunnel effect."
In addition, using it on the wall at the end of a hallway can create interest, reduce the tunnel effect, and ultimately brighten up a room.
Councillors were also pleased that the blocks would deal with a ground level wind tunnel effect which has been a nuisance to users of Alpha Tower for years.
5 2014: Tower block 'wind tunnel' A BIRMINGHAM councillor warned that a new city centre tower block could create a gale force wind tunnel effect and called for tests to be carried out for safety reasons ahead of construction.