turban


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tur·ban

 (tûr′bən)
n.
1. A headdress consisting of a long piece of cloth wound around a small cap or directly around the head, traditionally worn in North Africa, the Near East, and Central and South Asia.
2. A hat that resembles a turban, especially a brimless, close-fitting cap of draped fabric.

[French, from Ottoman Turkish tülbend, piece of muslin cloth used as a head covering or headscarf, variant of earlier dülbend, from Persian dōlband, wrapping cloth for a turban : from dōl, bucket (probably in reference to the tall cap around which a turban was wound and of Arabic origin; akin to Syriac dawlā and Akkadian dalû, bucket) + band, band of cloth, puttee; see bund1.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

turban

(ˈtɜːbən)
n
1. (Clothing & Fashion) a man's headdress, worn esp by Muslims, Hindus, and Sikhs, made by swathing a length of linen, silk, etc, around the head or around a caplike base
2. (Clothing & Fashion) a woman's brimless hat resembling this
3. (Clothing & Fashion) any headdress resembling this
[C16: from Turkish tülbend, from Persian dulband]
ˈturbaned, ˈturbanned adj
ˈturban-ˌlike adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

tur•ban

(ˈtɜr bən)

n.
1. a man's headdress worn chiefly by Muslims in S Asia, consisting of a long cloth of silk, linen, cotton, etc., wound either about a cap or directly around the head.
2. any headdress resembling this, esp. a woman's close-fitting, brimless hat of soft fabric.
[1555–65; earlier torbant, variant of tulbant < Turkish tülbent < Persian dulband]
tur′baned, adj.
tur′ban•like`, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.turban - a traditional Muslim headdress consisting of a long scarf wrapped around the headturban - a traditional Muslim headdress consisting of a long scarf wrapped around the head
headdress, headgear - clothing for the head
2.turban - a small round woman's hatturban - a small round woman's hat    
woman's hat, millinery - hats for women; the wares sold by a milliner
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
عِمامَه
turban
turban
turbano
دستار
turbanenturbanner
turbán
túrban
turbanas
turbāns
turban
turban
turban
чалма

turban

[ˈtɜːbən] Nturbante m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

turban

[ˈtɜːrbən] nturban m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

turban

nTurban m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

turban

[ˈtɜːbən] nturbante m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

turban

(ˈtəːbən) noun
a long piece of cloth worn wound round the head, especially by men belonging to certain of the races and religions of Asia.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Taking off my turban I bound myself securely to it with the linen in the hope that the roc, when it took flight next morning, would bear me away with it from the desolate island.
His under apparel was green, and so was his hat, being in the form of a turban, daintily made, and not so huge as the Turkish turbans.
Presently, the coach came; and, after many sorrowful farewells, and a great deal of running backwards and forwards across the pavement on the part of Miss La Creevy, in the course of which the yellow turban came into violent contact with sundry foot-passengers, it
In her neat black turban hat was the gold-green wing of a macaw.
The dress was a sombre grayish beige, untrimmed and unbraided, and she wore a small turban of the same dull hue, relieved only by a suspicion of white feather in the side.
Miss Pinkerton did not understand French; she only directed those who did: but biting her lips and throwing up her venerable and Roman-nosed head (on the top of which figured a large and solemn turban), she said, "Miss Sharp, I wish you a good morning." As the Hammersmith Semiramis spoke, she waved one hand, both by way of adieu, and to give Miss Sharp an opportunity of shaking one of the fingers of the hand which was left out for that purpose.
He held a small lance in his hand, and was dressed in a silk robe, with a turban on his head, to which were fastened some rings of very neat workmanship, which fell down upon his forehead.
Anne Mitchell had tried to put on a turban like mine, as I wore it the week before at the concert, but made wretched work of it -- it happened to become my odd face, I believe, at least Tilney told me so at the time, and said every eye was upon me; but he is the last man whose word I would take.
Her features, never the most agreeable, and now harsh with age and grief, and resentment against the world for his sake; her dress, and especially her turban; the queer and quaint manners, which had unconsciously grown upon her in solitude,--such being the poor gentlewoman's outward characteristics, it is no great marvel, although the mournfullest of pities, that the instinctive lover of the Beautiful was fain to turn away his eyes.
I am out shopping early with Ma, and I said I had a headache and got Ma to leave me outside in the phaeton, in Piccadilly, and ran round to Sackville Street, and heard that Sophronia was here, and then Ma came to see, oh such a dreadful old stony woman from the country in a turban in Portland Place, and I said I wouldn't go up with Ma but would drive round and leave cards for the Boffins, which is taking a liberty with the name; but oh my goodness I am distracted, and the phaeton's at the door, and what would Pa say if he knew it!'
You may think with what emotions, then, the seamen beheld this old Oriental perched aloft at such unusual hours; his turban and the moon, companions in one sky.
Arrayed in a new calico dress, with clean, white apron, and high, well-starched turban, her black polished face glowing with satisfaction, she lingered, with needless punctiliousness, around the arrangements of the table, merely as an excuse for talking a little to her mistress.