turbidity current


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turbidity current

n.
A swift downhill current in water, air, or other fluid, triggered by the weight of suspended material such as silt in a current flowing down a continental shelf or snow in an avalanche.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

turbidity current

n
(Physical Geography) a swirling mass of water and suspended material stirred up by a tsunami, a storm, a river in flood, etc
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

turbid′ity cur`rent


n.
a turbid, dense current of sediments in suspension moving along the slope and bottom of a lake or ocean.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Low silisiclastic contents in Ngataturi claystone (Whangai Formation facies) indicate a distant or low relief source but the presence of glauconitic suggests intermittent influxes of coarser silisiclastic material, possibly by turbidity current.
(1986), respectively, and indicate traction bed-load or traction carpet at the base of high-concentration turbidity current. Facies Isp-1 and Isp-2 are mostly, but not exclusively, related; Isp-2 gradationally overlies the Isp-1 and their combination represents the "graded-stratified bed" of Walker (1978).
Most slides are complex, and may include a rotational component resulting in uplift in one area and down-drop in another; failure typically progresses from a slide to a debris flow and eventually a turbidity current (Locat and Lee 2002).
We suggest that this increase in height can lead to minimizing the particle deposition in the turbidity current. The flow in the confined channel is established further downstream from the source (about 500 [h.sub.in]) than for the unconfined channel (about 200 [h.sub.in]).
Remarkably, a sediment-laden turbidity current had surged over the instrument less than 5 hours after it had been deployed, says Paull.
Scientists attributed the breaks to a turbidity current, a heavy slurry that raced down the slope at speeds up to 55 km per hour and extended 700 km after a large underwater landslide threw muds into suspension.
It seems interesting that undersea flows have at least one characteristic different from rivers: "While river floods on land can create natural levees a few meters tall, the levees formed by [undersea] turbidity currents can grow up to 100 m[eters] high" ("Hidden Canyons" SN: 1/1/05, p.
But underwater turbidity currents may have played a role in carving the canyon's deepest chasms.
Turbidity currents are the fastest and most destructive currents in the ocean.