turbojet

(redirected from Turbo-jet)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Turbo-jet: Turbojet Ferry
click for a larger image
turbojet

tur·bo·jet

 (tûr′bō-jĕt′)
n.
1. A jet engine having a turbine-driven compressor and developing thrust from the exhaust of hot gases.
2. An aircraft in which a turbojet is used.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

turbojet

(ˈtɜːbəʊˌdʒɛt)
n
1. (Aeronautics) short for turbojet engine
2. (Aeronautics) an aircraft powered by one or more turbojet engines
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

tur•bo•jet

(ˈtɜr boʊˌdʒɛt)

n.
2. an airplane equipped with one or more turbojet engines.
[1940–45]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
click for a larger image

tur·bo·jet

(tûr′bō-jĕt′)
1. A jet engine in which the exhaust gas operates a turbine that in turn drives a compressor that forces air into the intake of the engine.
2. An aircraft powered by an engine or engines of this type.
Did You Know? Fully loaded, a jumbo-sized airliner weighs nearly 800,000 pounds. Yet its turbojet engines are so powerful that it hurtles down the runway fast enough to lift it into air and climb to 35,000 feet. Where does this power come from? From the movement of air itself. Every turbojet has a compressor, a series of small rotating fan blades. These blades draw in air and pressurize it, driving it back into a combustion chamber where a fuel (such as kerosene) is injected and ignited. The burning of the fuel causes the air to expand, adding to the already high pressure and causing the mixture of hot air and gas to rush over turbines with enormous speed. This causes the turbine blades to turn, and they spin a drive shaft that rotates the compressor fans. The hot pressurized air then blasts out the rear opening of the engine, forcing the plane forward. Most turbojet engines today are turbofans and have a large fan at the front that is turned by one of the turbines. Every second, the fan sucks in enough air to empty an average-sized house, adding to the volume and pressure of the air rotating the turbines and providing forward thrust.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

turbojet

A jet engine whose air is supplied by a turbine-driven compressor, the turbine being activated by exhaust gases.
Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms. US Department of Defense 2005.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.turbojet - an airplane propelled by a fanjet engine
fanjet engine, turbofan engine, turbojet engine, turbojet, turbofan, fanjet, fan-jet - a jet engine in which a fan driven by a turbine provides extra air to the burner and gives extra thrust
jet, jet plane, jet-propelled plane - an airplane powered by one or more jet engines
2.turbojet - a jet engine in which a fan driven by a turbine provides extra air to the burner and gives extra thrustturbojet - a jet engine in which a fan driven by a turbine provides extra air to the burner and gives extra thrust
afterburner - a device injects fuel into a hot exhaust for extra thrust
fanjet, fan-jet, turbofan, turbojet - an airplane propelled by a fanjet engine
gas turbine - turbine that converts the chemical energy of a liquid fuel into mechanical energy by internal combustion; gaseous products of the fuel (which is burned in compressed air) are expanded through a turbine
jet engine - a gas turbine produces a stream of hot gas that propels a jet plane by reaction propulsion
propjet, turboprop, turbo-propeller plane - an airplane with an external propeller that is driven by a turbojet engine
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

turbojet

[ˈtɜːbəʊˈdʒet]
A. Nturborreactor m
B. CPDturborreactor
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

turbojet

[ˈtɜːrbəʊdʒɛt] nturboréacteur m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

turbojet

n (= engine)Turbotriebwerk nt; (= aircraft)Düsenflugzeug nt, → Turbojet m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

turbojet

[ˌtɜːbəʊˈdʒɛt] nturbogetto, turboreattore m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Rowhani also unveiled the first Iranian-made turbo-jet engine Aug 21, saying it was capable of flight at 50,000 feet.
Aviation fuels fall into two basic groups: aviation turbine fuels (jet fuels) for use in turbofan, turbo-jet and turbo-prop engines, and aviation gasoline for use in reciprocating or piston engines.
Air taxi operations refer to single and multi-engine aircraft (other than turbo-jet) that have a maximum certificated take-off weight of 19,000 pounds or less, and a seating configuration, excluding pilot seats, of nine or fewer.
The three of kind Corvettes had the big block 390 HP Turbo-Jet V8 engine, and all painted the Riverside Gold and Black design especially prepared for the Apollo XII Astronauts by industrial designer Alex Tremulis.
Musumeci arrived as a high-rolling, politically incorrect millionaire whose personal turbo-jet could get him from Eugene to Portland in less than 15 minutes.
More fuel is used by a jet or turbo-jet powered aircraft flying at 25,000 feet than at 30,000 feet, because the higher it flies the thinner the atmosphere, so the less resistance to overcome.
He also describes the J58--the SR-71 Blackbird's engine--as a turbo-jet rather than a combined-cycle turbo-ramjet (p.
Gone is the third leg of the Clinton formulation: abortion is still to be "safe and legal" but no longer "rare." This always rankled pro-abortionists who, like Linda Hirshman (writing at Slate.com), angrily dismiss the old three-part formulation as a "self-destructive cycle." Abortion is not a "necessary evil," she writes disdainfully, but operates like a turbo-jet engine propelling women "seeking the flourishing life prospects."
From the presentation of his design for a jet engine in the 1920s, he went on to patent his turbo-jet engine in 1930.