turgor pressure


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turgor pressure

n
(Botany) the pressure exerted on a plant cell wall by water passing into the cell by osmosis. Also called: hydrostatic pressure
References in periodicals archive ?
Potassiums influence on cell turgor pressure and water relations in the plant helps the plants resist the effects of drought and temperature extremes, and aids resistance to many plant diseases and environmental stresses.
The increase in Na+ concentration may be due to fact that quinoa plants accumulate Na+ which is readily available for cytosolic osmotic adjustment and sustaining turgor pressure, so to manage a suitable K+: Na+ concentration in leaves, the increased Na+ uptake should be followed by enhanced K+ transport from root to shoot (Cuin et al.
The higher mass of fruits harvested in bell pepper plants irrigated at -6 kPa (Figure 6A) possibly results from the growth of the pericarp due to the availability of water, which increases the turgor pressure of the cell (Lacerda et al.
Potassium plays an important role in plant nutrition, influencing many physiological processes such as carbohydrates translocation, protein synthesis, enzymes activation, stomata opening and closure, turgor pressure regulation and control of C[O.
In plant, a stiff pecto-cellulosic network encapsulates cells and counterbalances stress created by turgor pressure inside the cell, thereby controlling cell shape.
These mechanisms lead to acidification of the apoplast and the activation of cell wall degrading exo-enzymes, making it more susceptible to the vacuolar turgor pressure and consequently, to cell elongation.
grisea is influenced externally by surface feature and internally regulated and/ or modulated by several cascading biochemical pathways ultimately leading to turgor pressure development for penetration.
Other than affecting the bulliform cells, water deficit also causes the guard cells to lose their turgor pressure [66], thus leading to stomatal closure [67].
The major physiological mechanism to maintain leaf turgor pressure by decreasing osmotic potential is osmotic adjustment.
Illumination from above results in greater turgor pressure in the abaxial motor cells compared to the adaxial motor cells; while leaves in the dark have the reverse turgor gradient [4,19, 20].