turnback

(redirected from turnbacks)

turnback

(ˈtɜːnˌbæk)
n
1. (Clothing & Fashion) a part of a garment or similar item that is folded or turned back
2. archaic someone who turns back
3. the action of turning back or turning something back
4. (Railways) railways Austral a place on a railway line, road, or other route where vehicles can change direction
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
$170-$180 pavilion seating; $49-$54 lawn seating (sold out, but call for possible turnbacks).
During the election campaign, the Prime Minister and then-Opposition Leader Bill Shorten pledged ongoing support for the boat turnbacks policy
In so doing, nativist parties have created a new normal -- bringing policies like turnbacks of refugee boats, offshore detention and family separations from the margins to the mainstream.
The Border Patrol refers to tins estimate as "gotaways." It also estimates "turnbacks"--those who enter illegally but then decide to return to Mexico before being apprehended.
(35) Janet Phillips, Boat Arrivals and Boat "Turnbacks" in Australia since 1976: A Quick Guide to the Statistics (Canberra: Parliamentary Library, 2015), http://www.aph.gov.au/About_Parliament/Parliamentary_Departments/ Parliamentary_Library/pubs/rp/rp1617/Quick_Guides/BoatTurnbacks.
The maneuver is usually referred to as a turnback, and was the topic of our January 2006 article, "Turnbacks Reconsidered."
The surviving members were joined by 13 turnbacks, a PMA term for cadets belonging to previous classes.
He warned Australia that Indonesia will no longer tolerate the navy incursions in its waters during boat turnbacks. The Australian Labour Party has already sought an urgent meeting on the issue from Morrison's office and the UNHCR.
That road can only begin, however, when certain border security measures are met, including a 90 percent effectiveness rate for deterring illegal entries, defined as "the number of apprehensions and turnbacks in a specific sector divided by the total number of illegal entries."
Over time, and as the "quality process" emerged, it became clear that the internal customers of the transportation process were numerous and included customer service; contract and rate departments; dispatch teams that tendered loads, handled turnbacks, expedited shipments, and rescheduled late deliveries; warehouses that loaded the trailers and needed to ensure the safety of equipment and personnel on and around the loading docks; freight payment and claims teams; and finally the transportation management team.
The uniform had short turnbacks and was finished off with a woollen cavalry belt instead of the cross belt with ammunition box, while the mounted artillery wore a shoulder-belt with a hook for a rifle.