turnip

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tur·nip

 (tûr′nĭp)
n.
1. A widely cultivated Eurasian plant (Brassica rapa) of the mustard family, having a large rounded edible whitish root and edible leaves.
2. The root of this plant, eaten as a vegetable.
3. Chiefly Northeast US A rutabaga.

[tur-, of unknown origin + English dialectal nepe, turnip (from Middle English, from Old English nǣp, from Latin nāpus).]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

turnip

(ˈtɜːnɪp)
n
1. (Plants) a widely cultivated plant, Brassica rapa, of the Mediterranean region, with a large yellow or white edible root: family Brassicaceae (crucifers)
2. (Plants) the root of this plant, which is eaten as a vegetable
3. (Plants) any of several similar or related plants
4. (Plants) another name for kohlrabi
Also called (for senses 1, 2): navew
[C16: from earlier turnepe, perhaps from turn (indicating its rounded shape) + nepe, from Latin nāpus turnip; see neep]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

tur•nip

(ˈtɜr nɪp)

n.
1. the thick, fleshy root of either of two plants of the mustard family, the white-fleshed Brassica rapa, or the yellow-fleshed rutabaga, B. napobrassica, eaten as a vegetable.
2. either of these two plants, the leaves of which are sometimes eaten as a vegetable.
[1525–35; earlier turnep(e)= turn (with reference to its neatly rounded shape) + nepe turnip (Old English nēp, nǣ < Latin nāpus)]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.turnip - widely cultivated plant having a large fleshy edible white or yellow rootturnip - widely cultivated plant having a large fleshy edible white or yellow root
white turnip - white root of a turnip plant
turnip greens - tender leaves of young white turnips
Brassica, genus Brassica - mustards: cabbages; cauliflowers; turnips; etc.
turnip plant - any of several widely cultivated plants having edible roots
2.turnip - root of any of several members of the mustard familyturnip - root of any of several members of the mustard family
root vegetable - any of various fleshy edible underground roots or tubers
cruciferous vegetable - a vegetable of the mustard family: especially mustard greens; various cabbages; broccoli; cauliflower; brussels sprouts
white turnip - white root of a turnip plant
rutabaga, yellow turnip, swedish turnip, swede - the large yellow root of a rutabaga plant used as food
turnip plant - any of several widely cultivated plants having edible roots
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
جَذْر اللفْتلِفْتنَبات اللفْت
vodnicetuřín
kålroe
nauris
repa
répa
næpa
カブ
순무
ropė
rācenis
navetă
repa
repa
rova
หัวผักกาด
cây củ cải

turnip

[ˈtɜːnɪp] Nnabo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

turnip

[ˈtɜːrnɪp] nnavet mturn-off [ˈtɜːrnɒf] n
(= road) → sortie f
it's a real turn-off (= makes you lose interest) (gen)c'est vraiment rebutant; (sexually)ça vous coupe carrément l'envie turn of phrase nstyle m
to have a nice turn of phrase → savoir tourner un proposturn-on [ˈtɜːrnɒn] n
It's a turn-on → C'est excitant.
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

turnip

nRübe f; (= swede)Steckrübe f; (hum inf, = pocket watch) → Zwiebel f (hum inf)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

turnip

[ˈtɜːnɪp] nrapa
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

turnip

(təːnip) noun
1. a type of plant with a large round root. a field of turnips.
2. the root used as food. Would you like some turnip?
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

turnip

لِفْت tuřín kålroe Rübe γογγύλι nabo nauris navet repa rapa カブ 순무 raap nepe rzepa nabo репа rova หัวผักกาด şalgam cây củ cải 芜箐甘蓝
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in classic literature ?
Poyser," said Captain Donnithorne, when he had sufficiently admired the dairy and given several improvised opinions on Swede turnips and shorthorns.
There was not a tree within sight; there was not, at this season, a green pasture--nothing but fallow and turnips everywhere; in large fields divided by hedges plashed to unrelieved levels.
In Middlemarch admiration was more reserved: most persons there were inclined to believe that the merit of Fred's authorship was due to his wife, since they had never expected Fred Vincy to write on turnips and mangel-wurzel.
The poor man thought he would try to better himself; so, pulling off his red coat, he became a gardener, and dug his ground well, and sowed turnips.
MeCaskey, and hurled a stewpan full of bacon and turnips at her lord.
Tom Sawyer called the hogs "ingots," and he called the turnips and stuff "julery," and we would go to the cave and powwow over what we had done, and how many people we had killed and marked.
They change maybe to a field of turnips, and I have seen a farmer priding himself on a flock of sheep that I knew were really a most merry company of dryads and fauns in disguise.
Why, she in the workhouse and I hoeing turnips! Where would Black Beauty and Ginger have been if you had only thought of number one?
Their parents stuffed the empty sack with three rotten vegetable marrows, an old blacking-brush and two decayed turnips.
Then consider what victual or esculent things there are, which grow speedily, and within the year; as parsnips, carrots, turnips, onions, radish, artichokes of Hierusalem, maize, and the like.
Thomas wanted to hoe his turnips today so he asked me to come.
Authors have insisted on the necessity of classing varieties on a natural instead of an artificial system; we are cautioned, for instance, not to class two varieties of the pine-apple together, merely because their fruit, though the most important part, happens to be nearly identical; no one puts the swedish and common turnips together, though the esculent and thickened stems are so similar.