turpitude


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tur·pi·tude

 (tûr′pĭ-to͞od′, -tyo͞od′)
n.
1. Depravity; baseness.
2. A base act.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin turpitūdō, from turpis, shameful.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

turpitude

(ˈtɜːpɪˌtjuːd)
n
base character or action; depravity
[C15: from Latin turpitūdō ugliness, from turpis base]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

tur•pi•tude

(ˈtɜr pɪˌtud, -ˌtyud)

n.
1. vile or base character; depravity.
2. a vile or depraved act.
[1480–90; < Latin turpitūdō=turpi(s) base, vile + -tūdō -tude]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.turpitude - a corrupt or depraved or degenerate act or practiceturpitude - a corrupt or depraved or degenerate act or practice; "the various turpitudes of modern society"
evildoing, transgression - the act of transgressing; the violation of a law or a duty or moral principle; "the boy was punished for the transgressions of his father"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

turpitude

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

turpitude

noun
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

turpitude

[ˈtɜːpɪtjuːd] N (= liter) → infamia f, vileza f
to be dismissed for gross moral turpitudeser despedido por inmoralidad manifiesta, ser expulsado por conducta infame
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

turpitude

nVerderbtheit f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

turpitude

[ˈtɜːpɪˌtjuːd] n (frm) → turpitudine f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
As for the moral turpitude that man unveiled to me, even with tears of penitence, I can not, even in memory, dwell on it without a start of horror.
There was no turpitude which was not sacred on that day.
She wondered at herself--flushing at her own turpitude; for upon Barsoom it is a shameful thing for a woman to listen to those two words from another than her husband or her betrothed.
Then, with a little cold sigh, he seemed to signify that he regretfully surrendered the late marquis to the penalty of his turpitude. He gave a hardly perceptible shrug, took his neat umbrella from the servant in the vestibule, and, with his gentlemanly walk, passed out.
involve moral turpitude. The BIA has held that indecent exposure
She noted that "standards prepared by the Commission for the selection of ministers include not to nominate any former minister or agent of the Ministry or even the retired in rank of undersecretary of the Ministry, and must have a bachelor's degree or above, and have experience in the field work occupied in the ministry, at least 20 years, and to be of good conduct and reputation and not to be involved in issues of integrity or acts involving moral turpitude and also make it clear that covered by the de-Baathification."
To summarize, the ethical prohibition regarding criminal conduct by the attorney only applies to crimes that reflect on the lawyer's honesty, trustworthiness, or fitness to practiced law (so-called "crimes of moral turpitude").
I wonder if I am in the minority of Florida lawyers who question how a lawyer found guilty of grand theft, diversion, and conversion of client funds, and crimes of moral turpitude, is disbarred with permission to seek readmission.
Al Busaidi said that most of the applications that did not meet the requirements were due to involvement in a felony or crime involving moral turpitude -- 45 per cent of the total rejected applications.
The House agreed on the conditions to be met in a founding member of the party which is to be a Jordanian national, not convicted of a misdemeanor involving moral turpitude or felony, with the exception of political offenses unless he is rehabilitated.
A nation that popularises the insular orientations of its people, more than anything else, often degenerates into the dark recess of moral turpitude. In the Indian political landscape, such glaring propensities can be aptly described under the term 'Saffronisation'.