twenty-nine


Also found in: Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.twenty-nine - the cardinal number that is the sum of twenty-eight and onetwenty-nine - the cardinal number that is the sum of twenty-eight and one
large integer - an integer equal to or greater than ten
Adj.1.twenty-nine - being nine more than twentytwenty-nine - being nine more than twenty    
cardinal - being or denoting a numerical quantity but not order; "cardinal numbers"
References in classic literature ?
In the first part of ROBINSON CRUSOE, at page one hundred and twenty-nine, you will find it thus written:
"Twenty-nine days are given you for amendment, and then "
I wonder what he would have said when I gave him twenty-nine thousand eight hundred francs for his picture."
Now from this moment, twenty-nine minutes after eleven, a.m., this Wednesday, 2nd October, you are in my service."
"Twenty-nine flat," Captain Lynch reported, coming out from another look at the barometer, a chair in his hand.
So he fought twenty-nine after his badge had given him the right to retire from the field.
The duped Don Quixote did not miss a single stroke of the count, and he found that together with those of the night before they made up three thousand and twenty-nine. The sun apparently had got up early to witness the sacrifice, and with his light they resumed their journey, discussing the deception practised on Don Alvaro, and saying how well done it was to have taken his declaration before a magistrate in such an unimpeachable form.
Inwardly, in spite of his gross body and highly masculine whiskers, he was more like a maiden lady than a man of twenty-nine.
To begin with, he was more than five years older than myself at a time of life when five years really do count, I being twenty-nine and he thirty-four; then, on our first leaving port (I don't see why I should make a secret of the fact that it was Bangkok), a bit of manoeuvring of mine amongst the islands of the Gulf of Siam had given him an unforgettable scare.
At the Tabard Inn twenty-nine "of sundry folk," besides Chaucer himself, were gathered.
She lived twenty-nine years after his death, such active years until toward the end, that you never knew where she was unless you took hold of her, and though she was frail henceforth and ever growing frailer, her housekeeping again became famous, so that brides called as a matter of course to watch her ca'ming and sanding and stitching: there are old people still, one or two, to tell with wonder in their eyes how she could bake twenty-four bannocks in the hour, and not a chip in one of them.
I reached the age of twenty-nine without loving, for none of the feelings I before then experienced merit the apellation of love.