twice-told


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twice-told

(twīs′tōld′)
adj.
Very familiar because of repeated telling: "'Tis hard to ... lend fresh interest to a twice-told tale" (Byron).

twice-told

adj
hackneyed through repeated use

twice′-told′



adj.
having been told before; well-known.
[1400–50]
References in classic literature ?
"Ye've more'n earned your keep twice-told; "an' there's money owin' you, Penn, besides ha'af o' my quarter-share in the boat, which is yours fer value received."
At the risk of telling a twice-told tale, I will recapitulate the facts as they were known to the public at the conclusion of the inquest.
Instead of probing more deeply, the interviewer generally moves on to the next controversy, generating pretty much the same obvious and twice-told responses.
"Along with adopting Stevenson's twice-told tale style, Pearl assumes a Stevensonian air in the lush descriptions of tropical island life, dusky natives, cave-dwelling cannibals, and hair-raising cross-country pursuits....
Life is as tedious as twice-told tale, vexing the dull ear of a drowsy man.
In 1987 I published in this very same journal an essay on "Humor in Hawthorne's Twice-Told Tales' on the occasion of the 150th anniversary of the book's appearance.
Hawthorne chooses to present the story as a tale once heard (twice-told) and speculates on the states of mind of Wakefield and his wife from a removed point of view.
This was not the only element of these fairs, or even the principal one perhaps, but for American historians it has proven an irresistible story, even if now twice-told.
Jacques le fataliste is an 18th century road trip (on horseback), a more than twice-told tale, and a carnivalesque romp replete with serious underpinnings.
6 Like You Know It All (Hong Sang-soo) The Korean auteur's return to home ground--after the excursion to Paris and away from his trademark twice-told tales in Night and Day--may appear retrograde, but it hardly matters.
Some chapters are burdened with over-repetition; twice-told tales may help the reader remember salient points but a third or fourth retelling becomes tedious.
Their topics include functions and forms of eventfulness in narrative fiction, narrativity and performativity from Cervantes to Star Trek, diegetic and mimetic narrativity, and twisting the twice-told tale.