twisting


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twist

 (twĭst)
v. twist·ed, twist·ing, twists
v.tr.
1.
a. To wind together (two or more threads, for example) so as to produce a single strand.
b. To form in this manner: twist a length of rope from strands of hemp.
2. To wind or coil (vines or rope, for example) about something.
3. To interlock or interlace: twist flowers in one's hair.
4. To make (one's way) in a tortuous manner: twisted my way through the briar patch.
5. To cause to rotate or turn in another direction: twisted their heads around at the sound of the doorbell.
6. To impart a spiral or coiling shape to, as by turning the ends in opposite directions: twisting wire into a loop.
7.
a. To turn or open by turning: twisted off the bottle cap.
b. To pull, break, or snap by turning: twist off a dead branch.
8. To wrench or sprain: twist one's wrist.
9. To alter the normal aspect of; contort: twist one's mouth into a wry smile.
10. To alter or distort the intended meaning of: The cross-examiner twisted the words of the witness. See Synonyms at distort.
11. To alter or distort the mental, moral, or emotional character of: The trauma twisted the child's outlook.
v.intr.
1. To be or become twisted.
2. To move or progress in a winding course; meander: The river twisted toward the sea.
3. To squirm; writhe: twist with pain.
4. To rotate or turn in another direction: The owl's head twisted around toward me.
5. To dance the twist.
n.
1. Something twisted or formed by twisting, especially:
a. A length of yarn, cord, or thread, especially a strong silk thread used mainly to bind the edges of buttonholes.
b. Tobacco leaves processed into the form of a rope or roll.
c. A loaf of bread or other bakery product made from pieces of dough twisted together.
d. A sliver of citrus peel twisted over or dropped into a beverage for flavoring.
2. A spin, twirl, or rotation.
3. Sports
a. A complete rotation of the body around its vertical axis, as in diving and gymnastics.
b. A spinning motion given to a ball when thrown or struck in a specific way.
4.
a. The state of being twisted into a spiral; torsional stress or strain.
b. The degree or angle of torsional stress.
5.
a. A contortion or distortion of the body, especially the face.
b. A distortion of meaning: gave my words a misleading twist.
6. A sprain or wrench, as of an ankle.
7. A change in direction; a turn: a sharp twist in the path.
8. An unexpected change in a process or a departure from a pattern, often producing a distortion or perversion: a twist of fate; a story with a quirky twist.
9. A personal inclination or eccentricity; a penchant or flaw: an odd twist to his character.
10. A dance characterized by vigorous gyrations of the hips and arms.
Phrasal Verb:
twist off
To remove by twisting.
Idioms:
leave to twist/leave twisting in the wind
To abandon (someone) to a bad situation, often as a recipient of blame: "If our envoy was so blameless, why had she been left to twist in the wind?" (William Safire).
twist (someone's) arm Slang
To pressure or coerce: If you twist my arm, I'll stay for a second beer.

[Middle English twisten, to squeeze, be divided, from twist, a divided object, fork, rope, from Old English -twist; see dwo- in Indo-European roots.]

twist′a·bil′i·ty n.
twist′a·ble adj.
twist′ing·ly adv.
twist′y adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.twisting - the act of distorting something so it seems to mean something it was not intended to mean
falsification, misrepresentation - a willful perversion of facts
2.twisting - the act of rotating rapidlytwisting - the act of rotating rapidly; "he gave the crank a spin"; "it broke off after much twisting"
rotary motion, rotation - the act of rotating as if on an axis; "the rotation of the dancer kept time with the music"
pirouette - (ballet) a rapid spin of the body (especially on the toes as in ballet)
birling, logrolling - rotating a log rapidly in the water (as a competitive sport)
Adj.1.twisting - marked by repeated turns and bendstwisting - marked by repeated turns and bends; "a tortuous road up the mountain"; "winding roads are full of surprises"; "had to steer the car down a twisty track"
crooked - having or marked by bends or angles; not straight or aligned; "crooked country roads"; "crooked teeth"
Translations

twisting

[ˈtwɪstɪŋ]
A. N (gen) → retorcimiento m; [of meaning, words] → tergiversación f
B. ADJ [lane, street] → con recodos or revueltas; [staircase] → de caracol

twisting

[ˈtwɪstɪŋ]
1. adj (path) → serpeggiante
2. n (of body) → torsioni fpl; (of meaning) → travisamento
References in classic literature ?
Slowly the butt descended the several intervening inches, at the same time slightly twisting again.
You should accustom yourself, to walking straight forward without twisting from side to side.
Thus the whale-line folds the whole boat in its complicated coils, twisting and writhing around it in almost every direction.
Athos was meditating; Porthos was twisting his mustache; Aramis was saying his prayers in a charming little Book of Hours, bound in blue velvet.
My faith, gentlemen," said Porthos, turning round upon his chair and twisting his mustache, "that's a fair bet, I hope.
With this he conducted me to the verge of the cataract, and pointed along the side of the ravine to a number of curious looking roots, some three or four inches in thickness, and several feet long, which, after twisting among the fissures of the rock, shot perpendicularly from it and ran tapering to a point in the air, hanging over the gulf like so many dark icicles.
Satisfied by his scrutiny, my light limbed companion swung himself nimbly upon it, and twisting his legs round it in sailor fashion, slipped down eight or ten feet, where his weight gave it a motion not un-like that of a pendulum.
Michael was for growing restless at such searching examination, but Daughtry, in the midst of feeling out the lines and build of the thighs and hocks, paused and took Michael's tail in his magic fingers, exploring the muscles among which it rooted, pressing and prodding the adjacent spinal column from which it sprang, and twisting it about in a most daringly intimate way.
After she felt herself deserted by Princes Mary and alone in her grief, Natasha spent most of the time in her room by herself, sitting huddled up feet and all in the corner of the sofa, tearing and twisting something with her slender nervous fingers and gazing intently and fixedly at whatever her eyes chanced to fall on.
He grasped her arm, and twisting it, forced her into a creaking chair.
The hybrid tire cord includes a nylon primarily twisted yam and an aramid primarily twisted yam, wherein the nylon primarily twisted yam and the aramid primarily twisted yam are secondarily twisted together and after untwisting of the secondary twisting of the hybrid tire cord having a predetermined length, a length of the aramid primarily twisted yam is 1.
Synthesis of earlier developed design pattern [6, 7] for a case of any quantity of twisting operations is also performed.