two-by-four


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two-by-four

(to͞o′bī-fôr′, -bə-)
adj.
1. Measuring two units by four units, especially inches.
2. Slang Small in size; boxed in or cramped: a two-by-four apartment.
n.
A length of lumber that is 2 inches thick and 4 inches wide, or that is trimmed to slightly smaller dimensions.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

two-by-four

n
1. (Building) a length of untrimmed timber with a cross section that measures 2 inches by 4 inches
2. (Building) a trimmed timber joist with a cross section that measures 1 inches by 3 inches
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

two′-by-four`



adj.
1. two units thick and four units wide, esp. in inches.
2. Informal. unimportant; insignificant.
n.
3. a timber measuring 2 by 4 in. (5 x 10 cm) in cross section, when untrimmed: equivalent to 1? by 3? in. (4.5 x 9 cm) when trimmed.
[1880–85]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.two-by-four - a timber measuring (slightly under) 2 inches by 4 inches in cross sectiontwo-by-four - a timber measuring (slightly under) 2 inches by 4 inches in cross section
timber - a beam made of wood
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
With mill closures and waves of job losses devastating northwestern Ontario's economy, Leitch wants to take the forestry industry light years beyond the traditional two-by-four commodity market.
As unlikely as it may sound, a similar pitch worked on Budweiser, which funded Phillips' second trash building, fondly referred to by Huntsville residents as "the Budweiser House." (Says Phillips: "I love that I built a Bud house in the middle of the Baptist belt and that people are happy about it.") No, this house isn't shaped like a can of beer; it's a boutique cottage, complete with stained glass windows, Texas stars, a turret made out of the butt ends of two-by-four boards, and quite a few cleverly placed Bud logos.
With his carefully realized depictions of bricks and two-by-fours floating alone or in elegant yet uncategorizable combinations, Thompson wants to spur the viewer toward a moment of crystal-clear apprehension of the world and the way it's constructed, as well as an awareness of its fragility.