two-partyism

two-partyism

the condition in a nation of having two political parties with equal voting strength and little opposition from other parties.
See also: Politics
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, Duverger (1955) saw a tendency toward two-partyism in electoral systems employing single-member districts, while Reed (1991) saw a tendency for there to be four viable candidates in three-member districts, five viable candidates in four-member districts, and six viable candidates in five-member districts.
Leading commentators such as Ivor Jennings, Robert McKenzie and Samuel Beer all presented a positive view of postwar politics as being balanced between two forces that encouraged a 'tendency to reciprocal moderation'.(11) The growing forces of pluralism were initially kept in order by what Beer described as 'the robust regime of party government in the 1940s and 1950s', however, a 'fatal conjunction occurred after the mid-1960s, when the new group politics began to confront a party regime with diminishing powers'.(12) At this point, the post-war view of politics began to change rapidly, but not in favour of a more critical opinion of two-partyism, perhaps because the attention of the commentators was being diverted elsewhere.