twoness

twoness

(ˈtuːnəs)
n
the state or condition of being two
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Dubin does not appear to be the exception to the twoness of Jews and nature.
That's where we awaken to the essential truth of not twoness. This is not an -ism; it's a lived reality, germinated in the rich, dark soil of our devotional, form-filled experience.
He contrasts Pipik's usurpation of his identity with the Israeli author and Holocaust survivor Aharon Appelfeld, whose friendship with Roth represents their "distinctly radical twoness" in which they both "embody the reverse of the other's experience; because each recognizes in the other the Jewish man he is not;...
When consideration of the inhomogeneous boundary conditions (8), for each of the corner points N([x.sub.1] = l, [x.sub.2] = -L), K ([x.sub.1] =l, [x.sub.2]=L), the law of twoness of tangential stresses is fulfilled.
Once you notice this motif of doubling, the real running parallel to the imaginary, you see twoness everywhere.
about twoness, allowing for the avoidance of the third space which is
One ever feels his twoness,--an American, a Negro; two souls, two thoughts, two unreconciled strivings; two warring ideals in one dark body, whose dogged strength alone keeps it from being torn asunder (as cited in Soitos, 1996, p.
And yet, in a bit of a twist--and in what seems to be a climactic gestalt moment in the book--Crouse argues that O'Donovan does in fact have a functioning twoness concept that not only reflects aspects of Luther's thought, but also reflects aspects of all of the previously discussed types of two-kingdoms thought.
This "twoness, warring ideals in one dark body, these unreconciled strivings" are echoed in Fanon, but for DuBois, they evoke not just pathology but also strength and resilience since it is the black man's "dogged strength alone that keeps him from being torn asunder" (5).
Read in the context of formal play, of poetry's capacity to relieve words from the burden of everyday usage, the "sanctioned twoness" of reference illustrated by mine/mine is something to take pleasure in.
The conclusion reflects on both the historical narrative and its connection to an account of modern liberalism, as well as a theological reflection on hermeneutical decisions of the "twoness" of Christian theology.
Indeed, if we have one horse and one dog, then there is no explanatory answer even to the question "Why are there two animals?" (We might, of course, be tempted to answer in this case by saying that there are two animals because there is one horse and one dog; but this is not to give a more determinate explanation of their diversity, their twoness. It is just to give a more determinate explanation of the oneness of each.) Just as the account of a thing's unity bottoms out at the level of its species, so the account of multiple things' diversity from each other bottoms out at the level of their species--unless they do not share a species, in which case it bottoms out at the level of their lowest shared genus.