tychism


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tychism

(ˈtaɪkɪzəm)
n
(Philosophy) philosophy the theory that chance is an objective reality at work in the universe, esp in evolutionary adaptations
[from Greek tukhē chance]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

tychism

1. the theory that chance is involved in evolution and that variation within a species is accidental.
2. the belief that chance rather than mere determinism operates in the cosmos. Cf. uniformitarianism.
See also: Evolution
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Far from determinism, the Pragmatism of James places uncertainty/spontaneity (tychism) at the very foundations of the cosmos.
(50) Peirce has a name for his theory of constant change: tychism, or absolute chance.
But is it sensible to renounce a global historical sociology that is founded upon systemic, differentiating comparisons that are temporally specific, and adopt in its stead an analytical strategy that conjoins an insistence on social commonalities of millennial extension with an abrupt and late invocation of radical tychism? This is a logic lacking in both reasoned theoretical justification and empirical persuasiveness; its only expressed rationale is a negating ambition, to overturn a paradigm deemed inherently ideological.
Condition implies necessity refutation and some theory of motives you cannot tell us now what you did not do after we hush the landscape from the drift itself from further drift headway back From shipless enveloping sea I will print you a syllabus Continuity probability even the predictability of drift every visible panorama device twig bough forest mountain Lecture on Tychism Synechism
I refer to such issues as determinism versus pure chance, fatalism versus tychism (the view of chance as a general cosmic factor), and other obstinate questions appropriate to works by Plato, Spinoza, and Kant.
Anyone who believes that chance is only present in indeterministic systems (the thesis of 'tychism' as Sklar calls it, pp.
The ideas of absolute or objective chance, primordial or thoroughgoing evolution, and genuine or irreducible continuity seemed to him especially ones "in the general line of growth of scientific ideas." Hence, tychism (his doctrine of absolute chance), synechism (his doctrine of irreducible continuity), and evolutionism were central to his vision of the cosmos.