tycoon


Also found in: Thesaurus, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

ty·coon

 (tī-ko͞on′)
n.
1. A wealthy and powerful businessperson or industrialist; a magnate.
2. Used formerly as a title for a Japanese shogun.

[Japanese taikun, title of a shogun, Middle Chinese tɦaj` kyn, great prince : tɦaj` kyn, great (also the source of Mandarin ) + kyn, prince (also the source of Mandarin jūn).]
Word History: In 1853, Commodore Matthew C. Perry sailed into a harbor near Tokyo and presented a letter from the American president Millard Fillmore demanding that Japan open itself to trade with the United States. At the time, the Japanese restricted foreign trade severely. Among Western nations, for example, only the Dutch were allowed to trade in Japan, and then only on a small island in the harbor of Nagasaki. This policy had been put in place in the 1630s by the shogun (as the rulers of premodern Japan were called). In late medieval times, the Japanese emperor had been reduced to a figurehead, and all real power belonged to the shogun, who ruled on the emperor's behalf. On the date of Perry's visit, the Tokugawa family had held the shogunate for 250 years, as a kind of hereditary monarchy. Although Perry believed that he was dealing with emissaries from the emperor, nominally the ruler of the land, in fact he met the representatives of the shogun. The emissaries spoke of the shogun as the taikun, using a title of Chinese origin that literally means "great prince." This title was used by Japanese officials in foreign relations because tennō, "emporer," was obviously unavailable—the shogun ruled the Empire of Japan in the emperor's name. The title shōgun itself was probably not considered grand enough, as it literally means just "general of the army." Accounts of Perry's visit made the shogun's title taikun well-known back in the United States as tycoon, and Abraham Lincoln's cabinet members took up tycoon as an affectionate nickname for the president. The word soon came to be used for business and industry leaders in general—at times being applied to figures like J.P. Morgan, who may indeed have wielded more power than many princes and presidents.

tycoon

(taɪˈkuːn)
n
1. (Commerce) a business man of great wealth and power
2. (Historical Terms) an archaic name for a shogun
[C19: from Japanese taikun, from Chinese ta great + chün ruler]

ty•coon

(taɪˈkun)

n.
1. a wealthy and powerful businessperson; magnate.
2. a title used by foreigners to refer to the Japanese shogun.
[1855–60; < Japanese taikun < Middle Chinese, = Chinese great + jūn prince]

tycoon

- Comes from Japanese tai, "great," and kun, "prince, lord," from Chinese da, "great," and jun, "prince, ruler."
See also related terms for prince.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tycoon - a very wealthy or powerful businessmantycoon - a very wealthy or powerful businessman; "an oil baron"
businessman, man of affairs - a person engaged in commercial or industrial business (especially an owner or executive)
oil tycoon - a powerful person in the oil business

tycoon

noun magnate, capitalist, baron, industrialist, financier, fat cat (slang, chiefly U.S.), mogul, captain of industry, potentate, wealthy businessman, big cheese (slang, old-fashioned), plutocrat, big noise (informal), merchant prince a self-made property tycoon
Translations
من كِبار رِجال الأعْمال
magnát
=-magnatmagnat
iparmágnás
viîskipta-/auîjöfur
magnāts
kodamankralı

tycoon

[taɪˈkuːn] Nmagnate m
an oil tycoonun magnate del petróleo

tycoon

[taɪˈkuːn] nmagnat m
a business tycoon → un magnat des affaires

tycoon

nMagnat(in) m(f); business/oil tycoonIndustrie-/Ölmagnat(in) m(f)

tycoon

[taɪˈkuːn] n (business) tycoonmagnate m

tycoon

(taiˈkuːn) noun
a rich and powerful businessman. an oil tycoon.
References in classic literature ?
It is situated in the bay of Yeddo, and at but a short distance from that second capital of the Japanese Empire, and the residence of the Tycoon, the civil Emperor, before the Mikado, the spiritual Emperor, absorbed his office in his own.
Will called him the "Typhoon," meaning Tycoon, and the name stuck to him to his great disgust.
In addition, the vendors to the Possible Transaction have agreed not to enter into any discussion or negotiation with other third parties in relation to a sale of the equity interest in Tycoon Beverage Group Co.
THE FIRST TYCOON: THE EPIC LIFE OF CORNELIUS VANDERBILT tells of the founder of a dynasty who amassed a great fortune and became an American legend--but it goes beyond the usual casual review and offers the first complete biography of the man.
The tycoon made his money in the property and car import business.
An agricultural feed manufacturer and aluminum tycoon was named Thursday as China's richest person in an annual list of the country's wealthiest people.
Byline: Cracks surface in Egyptian business tycoon's defence team as trial set to begin on October 18.
Tycoon was produced by Jones's specially created production company Peter Jones TV.
"It's been pretty boring until now, but business is the new rock 'n' roll," smiles entrepreneur Peter Jones, star of the new series Tycoon (ITV1, Tuesday).
FLINTHEART TYCOON, about to complete his work in Seattle and anxious to get back east to his plant, calls: "Eliot 6800 ...
TELECOMWORLDWIRE-23 February 2007-Hands-On Mobile releases Monopoly Tycoon 2007(C)1994-2007 M2 COMMUNICATIONS LTD http://www.m2.com
A computer game called Prison Tycoon allows players to pretend they're the warden of a private prison-players build the prison, hire staff, create activities for inmates, break up fights and handle gang problems.