tympanic

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Related to tympanic plexus: tympanic cavity

tym·pan·ic

 (tĭm-păn′ĭk)
adj.
1. Relating to or resembling a drum.
2. also tym·pa·nal (tĭm′pə-nəl) Anatomy Of or relating to the middle ear or eardrum.

[From Latin tympanum, drum; see tympanum.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

tympanic

(tɪmˈpænɪk)
adj
1. (Architecture) anatomy architect of, relating to, or having a tympanum
2. (Music, other) of, relating to, or resembling a drumhead
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

tym•pan•ic

(tɪmˈpæn ɪk)

adj.
pertaining or belonging to a tympanum.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.tympanic - resembling a drum
2.tympanic - associated with the eardrumtympanic - associated with the eardrum    
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

tympanic

adj (Anat) tympanic boneMittelohrknochen m; tympanic membraneTrommelfell nt, → Tympanum nt (spec)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

tym·pan·ic

a. timpánico-a, resonante; rel. al tímpano
___ membranemembrana ___;
___ resonanceresonancia ___.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

tympanic

adj timpánico
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Middle ear paragangliomas are slowly growing, benign vascular lesions that arise from the tympanic plexus on the cochlear promontory.
A branch from the geniculate ganglion near the greater superficial petrosal nerve, which developed earlier, is reduced to a communication as the tympanic plexus and the lesser petrosal nerve develop from the IXth cranial nerve.
[5] The bony tube, the anterolateral cartilaginous lamina, and the tubal mucosa are innervated by the tubal branch of Jacobson's nerve and the tympanic plexus. [5] Our patient's symptoms could be explained by this innervation, as inflammations of the tube could lead to otalgia, vertigo, and nausea.