tympanites


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Related to tympanites: thrombus, myocarditis

tym·pa·ni·tes

 (tĭm′pə-nī′tēz)
n.
A distension of the abdomen resulting from the accumulation of gas or air in the intestine or peritoneal cavity. Also called tympany.

[Middle English, from Late Latin tympanītēs, from Greek tumpanītēs, from tumpanon, drum.]

tym′pa·nit′ic (-nĭt′ĭk) adj.

tympanites

(ˌtɪmpəˈnaɪtiːz)
n
(Pathology) distension of the abdomen caused by an abnormal accumulation of gas in the intestinal or peritoneal cavity, as in peritonitis. Also called: meteorism or tympany
[C14: from Late Latin, from Greek tumpanitēs concerning a drum, from tumpanon drum]
tympanitic adj

tym•pa•ni•tes

(ˌtɪm pəˈnaɪ tiz)

n.
gross distention of the abdominal wall by gas in the peritoneal cavity or intestines.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Late Latin tympanītēs < Greek tympanitēs, derivative of týmpanon drum (see tympanum)]
tym`pa•nit′ic (-ˈnɪt ɪk) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tympanites - distension of the abdomen that is caused by the accumulation of gas in the intestines or the peritoneal cavity
dilatation, distention, distension - the state of being stretched beyond normal dimensions
Translations

tym·pa·ni·tes

n. timpanitis, distensión del abdomen causada por acumulación de gas en los intestinos.
References in periodicals archive ?
X-ray of bone was performed on the proband and his mother, but no osteolysis, osteosclerosis, or cortical thickening were found, and only joint contractures and intestinal tympanites were observed in the proband [Figure 3].
Applied in layers as a rubefacient over the chest, especially of a child, in labored breathing, cough, pulmonary affections and bronchitis; over the liver when it is congested; over the abdomen in colic and flatulence; and over mammary glands to resolve glandular swellings and to suppress the secretion of milk in case of mammary abscesses; they are also locally used in orchitis and ovaritis; they are a useful dressing for blistered surfaces and ulcers; they are an excellent substitute for oiled skin and gutta-percha tissue; they are used as a pessary in constipation or tympanites of children.
Bloat or tympanites of the rumen occurs in ruminants when the gases produced during fermentation cannot be expelled through eructation.