type 1 diabetes


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Related to type 1 diabetes: type 2 diabetes

type 1 diabetes

or type 1 diabetes mellitus
n.
A chronic autoimmune disease in which the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas are destroyed, leading to high glucose levels in the blood and resulting in impaired metabolism of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins. The disease, which is characterized by excessive thirst, frequent urination, metabolic acidosis, and wasting, typically appears in childhood or adolescence and requires lifelong administration of insulin. Also called insulin-dependent diabetes, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The study, involving treatment with an anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody (teplizumab), was conducted by Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet, an international collaboration aimed at discovering ways to delay or prevent type 1 diabetes.
The Role of Psychosocial Factors in Wellbeing and Self-Care in Young Adults with Type 1 Diabetes. Int J Diabet Res 2012; 1(1):1-6.
The known risk factors for type 1 diabetes include family history (anyone with a parent or sibling with type 1 diabetes has increased risk for the condition), genetics, geography (the incidence of the disease increases as one travels away from the equator), and age.
Approximately one in 250 newborns will develop autoimmunity to pancreatic beta cells in childhood and receive a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes before adulthood.
Differences in the rates of new diagnosed cases of Type 1 diabetes varied greatly among racial and ethnic groups, which the study attributed to differences in treatment of the disease, clinical outcomes and barriers to health care access, as shown in past research.
Dabelea reported that 32% of youth with type 1 diabetes and 72% of those with type 2 diabetes had at least one early complication.
Because of the dangers inherent with the co-diagnosis of type 1 diabetes and DEB, it is essential that routine screening for DEB in adolescents and young adults occurs during diabetes follow-up and primary care visits.
Now, using Diamond Light Source, the UK's synchrotron science facility to shine intense super powerful X-rays into samples, a team from Cardiff University's Systems Immunity Research Institute found the same killer T-cells that cause type 1 diabetes are strongly activated by some bacteria.
Alarmingly, almost half of the adults with diabetes are undiagnosed and more than half a million children are suffering from Type 1 diabetes and the percentage of Type 2 diabetes, especially in obese children have also increased tremendously.
There are three major types of diabetes: type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, and gestational diabetes.
Type 1 diabetes: In type 1 diabetes, the body's immune system attacks and destroys the cells that produce insulin.