glycogen storage disease

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glycogen storage disease

n.
Any of various genetic diseases caused by deficiency of one of the enzymes involved in breaking down or synthesizing glycogen, resulting in storage of abnormal amounts or types of glycogen and often affecting the liver, muscles, or both. Also called glycogenosis.
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Type Ib diamonds are intense yellow and orange in colour, that is produced by single nitrogen atoms that are scattered in the crystal structure of the diamond.
The Committee also adopted by consensus positive opinions for two type IB variation applications (subject to worksharing procedures) for Fevaxyn Pentofel (and a purely-nationally authorised product) concerning quality changes.
Researchers have suspected for years that these stars are the progenitors of Type Ib or Ic supernovae, whose light lacks the hydrogen spectral fingerprints typical of other core-collapse explosions.
He also explained how to differentiate between various natural and synthetic diamond types, and showed participants synthetic type Ib diamond crystals with metallic inclusions that were attracted by a magnet, faceted CVD synthetic diamonds and natural diamonds treated by HPHT and irradiation.
SJS type I has two recognized subtypes, IA and IB, which are similar except that type IB manifests earlier and with greater severity.
SN 2013ek is a Type Ib supernova, which is caused by the core collapse of massive stars that have shed - or lost - their outer layers of hydrogen.
Most WR stars are believed to finally progress to become Type Ib or Type Ic core-collapse supernovae (SNe).
Focal cortical dysplasia type IB is additionally marked by giant or immature neurons.
It was of type Ib and it didn't become very bright.
The topics include the two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis of DNA topoisomers, single-molecule magnetic tweezer studies of type IB topoisomers, binding DNA topoisomers I and II to replication origins, assaying topoisomers II checkpoints in yeast, the cytological analysis of chromosome structural defects that result from topoisomers II dysfunction, and the depletion and mutation of topoisomerase II in animal cells.