typeface


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type·face

 (tīp′fās′)
n. Printing
1.
a. The surface of a block of type that makes the impression.
b. The impression made by this surface.
2. The size or style of the letter or character on a block of type.
3. The full range of type of the same design.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

typeface

(ˈtaɪpˌfeɪs)
n
(Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) another name for face17
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

face

(feɪs)

n., v. faced, fac•ing. n.
1. the front part of the head, from the forehead to the chin.
2. a look or expression on this part: a sad face.
3. an expression or look that indicates ridicule, disgust, etc.; grimace: to make a face.
4. cosmetics; makeup: to put on one's face.
5. impudence; boldness.
6. outward appearance.
7. outward show or pretense.
8. good reputation; dignity; prestige.
9. the amount specified in a bill or note, exclusive of interest.
10. the manifest sense or express terms, as of a document.
11. the surface: the face of the earth.
12. the side, or part of a side, upon which the use of a thing depends: the face of a playing card.
13. the most important or most frequently seen side; front.
14. the outer or upper side of a fabric; right side.
15. any of the bounding surfaces of a solid figure: a cube has six faces.
16. the front or end of a drift or excavation, where the material is being or was last mined.
17.
a. the working surface of a printer's type or plate, etc.
b. Also called typeface. any design of type, including a full range of characters, as letters, numbers, and marks of punctuation, in all sizes.
c. Also called typeface. the general style or appearance of type: broad or narrow face.
18. either of the two outer sides that form the salient of a bastion.
19. any of the plane surfaces of a crystal.
v.t.
20. to look toward or in the direction of: to face the light.
21. to have the front toward or permit a view of: The building faces the street.
22. to confront directly: to face the future.
23. to confront courageously or impudently (usu. fol. by down or out): facing down an opponent.
24. to oppose or to meet defiantly: to face fearful odds.
25. to cover or partly cover with a different material in front: They faced the wooden house with brick.
26. to finish the edge of (a garment) with facing.
27. to turn the face of (a playing card) upwards.
28. to dress or smooth the surface of (a stone or the like).
v.i.
29. to turn or be turned: She faced toward the sea.
30. to be placed with the front in a certain direction: The barn faces south.
31. to turn to the right, left, or in the opposite direction: Left face!
32. face off,
a. Ice Hockey. to start play, as to begin a game or period, with a face-off.
b. to confront, as in a contest.
33. face up to,
a. to admit.
b. to meet courageously; confront.
Idioms:
1. face the music, to accept the consequences of one's actions.
2. in (or out of) someone's face, Slang. annoying (or ceasing to annoy) someone: You're always in my face!
3. in the face of,
a. in spite of; notwithstanding.
b. when confronted with.
4. lose face, to suffer humiliation.
5. on the face of it, according to appearances; seemingly.
6. save face, to escape from humiliation.
7. show one's face, to be seen; make an appearance.
8. to one's face, in one's very presence; in direct confrontation.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Anglo-French, Old French < Vulgar Latin *facia, for Latin faciēs facies]
face′a•ble, adj.
syn: face, countenance, visage refer to the front of the (usu. human) head. face is used when referring to physical features: a pretty face with high cheekbones. countenance, a more formal word, denotes the face as it is affected by or reveals a person's state of mind; hence, it often signifies the look or expression on the face: a thoughtful countenance. visage, still more formal, refers to the face as seen in a certain aspect, esp. as revealing a person's character: a stern visage.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.typeface - a specific size and style of type within a type familytypeface - a specific size and style of type within a type family
type - printed characters; "small type is hard to read"
type family - a complete set of type suitable for printing text
unicameral script - a script with a single case
bicameral script - a script having two distinct cases
constant-width font, fixed-width font, monospaced font, typewriter font - a typeface is which each character is given the same width (as by a typewriter)
proportional font - any font whose different characters have different widths
cartridge font, font cartridge - any font that is contained in a cartridge that can be plugged into a computer printer
black letter, Gothic - a heavy typeface in use from 15th to 18th centuries
bold, bold face, boldface - a typeface with thick heavy lines
italic - a typeface with letters slanting upward to the right
raster font, screen font - the font that is displayed on a computer screen; "when the screen font resembles a printed font a document may look approximately the same on the screen as it will when printed"
Helvetica, sans serif - a typeface in which characters have no serifs
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
police d’écriture

typeface

[ˈtaɪpfeɪs] Ntipo m, tipo m de letra, letra f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

typeface

[ˈtaɪpfeɪs] npolice f (de caractères)
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

typeface

[ˈtaɪpˌfeɪs] ncarattere m (tipografico)
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
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His typeface, which uses equal parts of both languages, is based on the principle that it is still possible, for the most part, to read and understand written sentences when the top or bottom half of each word is covered.
According to an article on "FontCast" development on the "FF Amman Serif TypeFace" began in 2008, when the " young type designer and multimedia artist Yanone visited Amman, the capital of Jordan, to develop a multiscript Latin-Arabic type family.