typewriter ribbon


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Related to typewriter ribbon: typewriter font
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.typewriter ribbon - a long strip of inked material for making characters on paper with a typewritertypewriter ribbon - a long strip of inked material for making characters on paper with a typewriter
strip, slip - artifact consisting of a narrow flat piece of material
typewriter - hand-operated character printer for printing written messages one character at a time
Translations

typewriter ribbon

nFarbband nt
References in periodicals archive ?
1886: The typewriter ribbon was patented by George Anderson of Memphis, Tennessee.
There is variation of course, particularly in font size from piece to piece as well as heavy or lightness of ink indicating the quality or age of the typewriter ribbon or the quality of the dot matrix printer used in conjunction with an electric word-processor.
Journalists as a whole often cling to an old-school approach to reporting, clutching their notepad while fondly recalling the lost smell of typewriter ribbon.
Most are carefully typed with flawless spacing and tabs; some even shift to a red typewriter ribbon for emphasis.
For exams, they removed the typewriter ribbon and used special waxed paper ("stencil"), occasionally toothpicking keys like "o" and "a" to extract stuck wax.
According to Jon's sources, Fleming had left for his annual stay there, in early January, 1957, "weighed down with about 200 pages of blank foolscap and a new typewriter ribbon.
world were smarter than brain surgeons by a typewriter ribbon mile.
If I had turned up for work as a cub reporter with an open-neck shirt I would have been whipped within an inch of my life with typewriter ribbon, my buttocks branded with the imprint of the editor's steel ruler.
Relying on the limited palette of ordinary typewriter ribbon colors--black, blue, red--Yackulic creates rippilng lines and suggestions of atmosphere using fields of punctuation marks to suggest texture.
That company, Kee Lox, was established in 1918 as a carbon paper and typewriter ribbon manufacturer, and early samples of its products are on display at Cannon IV'S modern 40,000-square-foot headquarters in the Cottage Home neighborhood, just east of downtown Indianapolis.
Perhaps she is in another room looking for that last typewriter ribbon, tucked away as a spare.
Army and venture firms to create a type of fabric that looks and feels similar to old typewriter ribbon, but does not smudge, can withstand direct flame and can carry an electric current