typhonian

typhonian

(taɪˈfəʊnɪən)
adj
(Classical Myth & Legend) of or relating to Typhon
References in periodicals archive ?
Peter Levenda, who has written extensively about the use of Lovecraft in the development of occultist Kenneth Grant's "Typhonian Current," has also complicated the picture for many occultists drawing on Lovecraft, by insisting that Lovecraft may have been inspired by an actual ancient text.
The Hermetic Qabalah is the basis for Qliphothic Qabala as studied by left hand path orders, such as the Typhonian Order.
Thus, Germany's greatest humanist, Johannes Reuchlin, in his De Verbo Mirofico (1494 C.E.), attests that Hebrew is "the language in which God, angels, and men spoke together, not through the ambiguous murmur of a Castallan spring, Typhonian cave or Dodonian wood, but as friends talk face to face." Consequently it is hardly surprising to read of medieval Christian monks who, upon approaching old age, would hurriedly study Hebrew, "knowing" that when their earthly days were over, they would have to know biblical Hebrew in order to converse with the heavenly angels!
Grant's occult organization, the Typhonian Ordo Templi Orientis (TOTO), which ultimately broke away from the mainline OTO, continues to use Lovecraft's works and themes within their ritual structures, alongside the more prosaic mythologies of ancient Egypt and Greece.
'Depiction of the Jews as Typhonians and Josephus' Strategy of Refutation in Contra Apionem,' in Feldman, L.H.