tyrothricin


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ty·ro·thri·cin

(tī′rō-thrī′sĭn)
n.
A substance obtained from the bacterium Bacillus brevis, composed chiefly of the polypeptide antibiotics tryocidine and gramicidin and used for topical treatment of infections caused by gram-positive bacteria.

[New Latin Tȳrothrix, former bacteria genus name (Greek tūros, cheese; see teuə- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots + Greek thrix, trikh-, hair, of unknown origin ) + -in.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

tyrothricin

(ˌtaɪrəʊˈθraɪsɪn)
n
(Pharmacology) an antibiotic, obtained from the soil bacterium Bacillus brevis, consisting of tyrocidine and gramicidin and active against Gram-positive bacteria such as staphylococci and streptococci: applied locally for the treatment of ulcers and abscesses
[C20: from New Latin Tyrothrix (genus name), from Greek turos cheese + thrix hair]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tyrothricin - a mixture of antibiotics applied locally to infections caused by Gram-positive bacteria
antibiotic, antibiotic drug - a chemical substance derivable from a mold or bacterium that can kill microorganisms and cure bacterial infections; "when antibiotics were first discovered they were called wonder drugs"
tyrocidin, tyrocidine - a basic polypeptide antibiotic derived from a soil bacterium; a major component of tyrothricin
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Trends in the susceptibility of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus to nine antimicrobial agents, including ceftobiprole, nemonoxacin, and tyrothricin: results from the tigecycline in vitro surveillance in Taiwan (TIST) study, 2006-2010.
American bacteriologist Rene Dubos first used an antibiotic, tyrothricin, successfully in the treatment of human disease in 1939.