ujamaa village

ujamaa village

(uːdʒaˈma)
n
(Sociology) (sometimes capitals) a communally organized village in Tanzania
[C20: ujamaa socialism, from Swahili: brotherhood]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
The government will be more effective in service delivery with concentration of people in given locations as opposed to when they are all over.This might be frowned at as advocating villagenisation, characterised by what Julius Nyerere, the then-President of Tanzania, called Ujamaa Village Model.
On the one hand, the principle of self-reliance was woven together with the Arusha Declaration's call for socialist community--at the levels of each ujamaa village, the Tanzanian nation, the African continent, and even the Third World broadly conceived.
People of these Ujamaa villages lived and worked in the farms with incentives from the government.
Tanzanian socialism drew upon an idealized vision of African communalism: 'In Nyerere's theory there would be a socialist nation when the whole nation had been organized on the basis of ujamaa villages where people lived together as was the case in traditional Africa ...
Chavez's planning minister, Jorge Giordani, trained as a development economist at Sussex University, whose Institute of Development Economics was the autor intelectual, as they say in Spanish, of the Ujamaa villages in Tanzania.
Aid money slated for ujamaa villages vanished and a general resentment against the system set in.
Unlike Stalin, Nyerere was an undeniably well-meaning leader; he even hoped, initially, that his people would move into his so-called ujamaa villages of their own flee will.
Scott traces the dire effects of high modernist ideology in realms as diverse as Soviet collectivization, Tanzanian ujamaa villages, scientific forestry, industrialized high-yield agriculture, political revolution, and Le Corbusier's city planning.
How this interdependent relationship between planning and management is an important indicator of the success or failure of a given development scheme is investigated in this paper by looking at the case of Ujamaa villages, a rural development scheme that took place in Tanzania between the late 1960s and early 1980s.