ulceration


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Related to ulceration: necrosis, fibrosis, ulcerative colitis

ul·cer·a·tion

 (ŭl′sə-rā′shən)
n.
1. Development of an ulcer.
2. An ulcer or an ulcerous condition.

ulceration

(ˌʌlsəˈreɪʃən)
n
1. (Pathology) the development or formation of an ulcer
2. (Pathology) an ulcer or an ulcerous condition
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ulceration - a circumscribed inflammatory and often suppurating lesion on the skin or an internal mucous surface resulting in necrosis of tissueulceration - a circumscribed inflammatory and often suppurating lesion on the skin or an internal mucous surface resulting in necrosis of tissue
lesion - any localized abnormal structural change in a bodily part
aphthous ulcer - a blister on the mucous membranes of the lips or mouth or gastrointestinal tract
bedsore, pressure sore - a chronic ulcer of the skin caused by prolonged pressure on it (as in bedridden patients)
chancroid - infectious venereal ulcer
peptic ulcer, peptic ulceration - an ulcer of the mucous membrane lining of the alimentary tract
canker sore, canker - an ulceration (especially of the lips or lining of the mouth)
noli-me-tangere - a cancerous ulcer of soft tissue and bone
noma - acute ulceration of the mucous membranes of the mouth or genitals; often seen in undernourished children
2.ulceration - the process of ulcer formationulceration - the process of ulcer formation; the process of becoming ulcerated
biological process, organic process - a process occurring in living organisms
Translations

ulceration

[ˌʌlsəˈreɪʃən] Nulceración f

ulceration

n (= process)Geschwürbildung f; (of wound)Vereiterung f; (= state)Geschwüre pl, → Vereiterung f

ul·cer·a·tion

n. ulceración, supuración; proceso de formación de una úlcera.

ulceration

n ulceración f
References in classic literature ?
But as the stumps of harpoons are frequently found in the dead bodies of captured whales, with the flesh perfectly healed around them, and no prominence of any kind to denote their place; therefore, there must needs have been some other unknown reason in the present case fully to account for the ulceration alluded to.
All loathing did I once vow to renounce: then did ye change my nigh ones and nearest ones into ulcerations. Ah, whither did my noblest vow then flee?
Ulceration is defined as breach in the surface of epithelium and in oral cavity ulceration occurs when there is loss of integrity of mucosal membrane showing surface excavation and sloughed necrotic tissue in a particular inflamed area.1 Apthous ulcers are among those mucosal diseases which are observed commonly in all dental settings and their presence imparts negative effect on quality of life resulting agony and irritation to the patients.2 They affect 25% of the population globally with greater prevalence in females mostly in third or fourth decade of life.3
The main clinical signs included fin ulceration, skin darkness, hepatohemia and intestinal hydrops.
The primary endpoint was met previously when subjects on ATB-346 exhibited a 3mm ulceration rate of 2.5% versus an ulceration rate of 42.1% for naproxen at the end of the 2-week treatment period.
The disease is particularly painful due to vascular occlusion, which commonly progresses to ulceration and subsequently heals slowly over weeks or months.
[4] It is thought that the incidence of ulceration is rising as a result of aging population and increased risk factors for atherosclerotic occlusion such as smoking, obesity and diabetes.
Any foot disease in people with diabetes must be taken seriously and treated promptly because ulceration can destroy the tissues of your foot.
We report a case of diffuse gastric ulceration due to radioactive yttrium seed migration to the stomach to alert clinicians to this exceptional cause of gastric injury and to the diagnostic difficulties of this underappreciated and potentially catastrophic complication of hepatic SIRT.
The three main pathologies that are associated with diabetic foot syndrome (DFS) are diabetic peripheral neuropathy, peripheral arterial disease and/or infection.1 The syndrome also encompasses complications like Charcot neuroarthropathy, osteomyelitis, foot ulceration and may lead to the most feared outcome, amputation.1 The prevalence of foot ulcers is reported to range from 4.0% to10.0% in patients with diabetes, which suggests that lifetime risk of developing foot ulcers in these patients may be as high as 25.0%.2-4 Of all the non-traumatic lower limb amputations, 8 out of 10 amputations are done in patients with diabetes, out of which 85.0% follow a foot ulcer.2,5,6
Further analysis of factors including age, ulceration, and tumor location showed that MR and thickness measures were not independent, and the potential for MR to predict SLN biopsy positivity declined at lower thickness values.