ulnar nerve


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ulnar nerve

n
(Anatomy) a nerve situated along the inner side of the arm and passing close to the surface of the skin near the elbow. See funny bone
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ulnar nerve - a nerve running along the inner side of the arm and passing near the elbowulnar nerve - a nerve running along the inner side of the arm and passing near the elbow; supplies intrinsic muscles of the hand and the skin of the medial side of the hand
nerve, nervus - any bundle of nerve fibers running to various organs and tissues of the body
arm - a human limb; technically the part of the superior limb between the shoulder and the elbow but commonly used to refer to the whole superior limb
crazy bone, funny bone - a point on the elbow where the ulnar nerve passes near the surface; a sharp tingling sensation results when the nerve is knocked against the bone; "the funny bone is not humerus"
References in periodicals archive ?
Ulnar The ulnar nerve is the nerve that jars when you bang your funny bone.
On Wednesday, the Sox placed Jimenez on the 10-day injured list with a right ulnar nerve contusion.
It's quite similar to carpal tunnel syndrome, but the problem originates further back up the arm, in the ulnar nerve.
These include carpal tunnel syndrome, ulnar nerve palsy, peroneal nerve palsy, and radial nerve palsy.
Lazzeri and Rossi suggest that the ulnar nerve in da Vinci's right hand might have been damaged, which led to ulnar palsy, a condition also known as claw hand.
In one-way ANOVA test, comparison of mean SNCV of Ulnar nerve, Median nerve and Sural nerve between control Group and two groups of cases (PEM Grade 1&2 and PEM Grade 3 & 4) was statistically significant (P<0.05) in all the three age groups.
It brings pain and weakness to patients.[1] There are three major considerations in treating this disease: central bone stability, lateral ligament stability, and medial ligament stability.[2] The medial ligament includes the anterior, posterior, and transverse bundles.[3] Its injury usually results from a valgus force and leads to medial instability, heterotopic ossification (HO) formation, and reduced elbow performance score, especially in elbow stiffness.[4] Worse still, the persistent instable state eventually causes ulnar nerve irritation and irreversible motor and sensory loss.[5] Therefore, it is very important and urgent to restore normal medial collateral ligament (MCL) structure and elbow stability.
Ulnar nerve entrapment at the elbow--also known as cubital tunnel syndrome (CuTS)--is a common condition partly derived from the elbow anatomy (1).
Electrical stimulation of the ulnar nerve was done proximal to the active recording electrode at the wrist crease just lateral to the flexor carpi ulnaris tendon.
[3] The ulnar nerve is the most susceptible neurovascular structure to compression associated with HO at the elbow.
Ulnar nerve and artery were located lateral to the tendon of the variant muscle (Figure 2).