ultraviolet


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ul·tra·vi·o·let

 (ŭl′trə-vī′ə-lĭt)
adj. Abbr. UV
1. Of or relating to electromagnetic radiation between violet visible light and x-rays in the electromagnetic spectrum, having frequencies between 790 terahertz and 30 petahertz and wavelengths between 380 nanometers and 10 nanometers.
2. Of or relating to a light bulb that emits ultraviolet radiation.
n.
The ultraviolet range of electromagnetic radiation: Sunburns result from radiation in the ultraviolet.

ultraviolet

(ˌʌltrəˈvaɪəlɪt)
n
(General Physics) the part of the electromagnetic spectrum with wavelengths shorter than light but longer than X-rays; in the range 0.4 × 10–6 and 1 × 10–8 metres
adj
(General Physics) of, relating to, or consisting of radiation lying in the ultraviolet: ultraviolet radiation. Abbreviation: UV

ul•tra•vi•o•let

(ˌʌl trəˈvaɪ ə lɪt)

adj.
1. pertaining to electromagnetic radiation having wavelengths in the range of approximately 5–400 nm, shorter than visible light but longer than x-rays.
2. pertaining to, producing, or using light having such wavelengths: an ultraviolet lamp. Compare infrared.
n.
3. ultraviolet radiation.
[1870–75]

ul·tra·vi·o·let

(ŭl′trə-vī′ə-lĭt)
Adjective
Relating to electromagnetic radiation having wavelengths shorter than those of visible light but longer than those of x-rays. See more at electromagnetic spectrum.
Noun
Ultraviolet light or the ultraviolet part of the spectrum. See Note at infrared.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ultraviolet - radiation lying in the ultraviolet rangeultraviolet - radiation lying in the ultraviolet range; wave lengths shorter than light but longer than X rays
actinic radiation, actinic ray - electromagnetic radiation that can produce photochemical reactions
sun-ray, sunray - a ray of artificial ultraviolet light from a sunray lamp
Adj.1.ultraviolet - having or employing wavelengths shorter than light but longer than X-raysultraviolet - having or employing wavelengths shorter than light but longer than X-rays; lying outside the visible spectrum at its violet end; "ultraviolet radiation"; "an ultraviolet lamp"
invisible, unseeable - impossible or nearly impossible to see; imperceptible by the eye; "the invisible man"; "invisible rays"; "an invisible hinge"; "invisible mending"
Translations
فَوْق البَنَفْسَجي
ultrafialový
ultraviolet
ultravioletti
ibolyántúli
útfjólublár
ultravioletinis
ultraviolets
ultravioleta
ultrafialový
ultraviolett
mor ötesi

ultraviolet

[ˈʌltrəˈvaɪəlɪt]
A. ADJultravioleta inv
B. CPD ultraviolet light Nluz f ultravioleta
ultraviolet radiation Nradiación f ultravioleta
ultraviolet rays NPLrayos mpl ultravioleta
ultraviolet treatment Ntratamiento m de onda ultravioleta

ultraviolet

[ˌʌltrəˈvaɪələt] adj [rays] → ultraviolet(te); [lamp] → à UV

ultraviolet

[ˌʌltrəˈvaɪəlɪt] adjultravioletto/a

ultraviolet

(altrəˈvaiəlit) adjective
(of light) consisting of rays from the invisible part of the spectrum beyond the purple, that have an effect on the skin, eg causing suntan.

ul·tra·vi·o·let

a. ultravioleta, que se extiende más allá de la zona violeta del espectro;
___ raysrayos ___;
___ therapyterapia de radiación ___.

ultraviolet

adj ultravioleta
References in periodicals archive ?
Use of the intensifier and VCR allows investigators and forensic researchers to visualize an ultraviolet image immediately, without waiting for film to be developed.
It has to do with the depletion of the ozone layer, the part of the earth's atmosphere responsible for filtering the sun's ultraviolet rays before they reach us here on the ground.
Ultraviolet B radiation is much more variable than ultraviolet A as latitude increases due to atmospheric scattering of the light and absorption by oxygen.
And more than 1.5 million years of life are lost every year due to excessive ultraviolet radiation exposure.
The protective pigment, called sporopollenin, and several of its long-lived breakdown products absorb a specific wave-length of ultraviolet radiation, says Lomax.
After cleaning, the air is then exposed to the ultraviolet light in the GUV module.
Erythema, or sunburn, is caused by a type of skin-damaging light called ultraviolet B, or UVB.
Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation at 13.4 nm holds promise because of the fortuitous high reflectivity of Mo/Si multilayer mirrors at this wavelength.
As they become acidified, the lakes and rivers would have reduced amounts of dissolved organic carbons, which would allow much greater penetration of ultraviolet light.
Hubble's Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) observed a similar phenomenon at longer ultraviolet wavelengths, also indicating that the companion star's light was visible but was later blocked by the primary during an eclipse.
To remotely control the channels' opening, Miesenbock and Lima developed molecules made up of ATP surrounded by a chemical cage that breaks down in the presence of ultraviolet light.