unactable


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Related to unactable: unacceptable

unactable

(ʌnˈæktəbəl)
adj
1. (Theatre) (of a play, role, etc) not able to be acted or dramatized
2. (Film) (of a play, role, etc) not able to be acted or dramatized
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.unactable - not actable; "an unactable play"
actable - capable of being acted; suitable for the stage; "an actable scene"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
SUP chief Syed Jalal Mehmood Shah said that federal government had started conspiracy against Sindh to construct dam on Indus river which is unactable act of government.
When one of Dujardin's unactable Symbolist plays was howled off the stage, despite an invited audience, Lautrec stayed to the last, saying 'I did not understand a word of it but I do not care.
Answering the charge that The Secret Life is "an unactable play" Barker remarks that he "may yet arrive at clarity but ...
Until recently, Margaret Lucas Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle, was regarded as a bizarre eccentric, churning out unactable plays and other self-contradictory, unstructured, and uneducated literary and scientific works in blissful ignorance of literary conventions and the laws of science.
After a series of existentially themed novels, including The Thief and the Dogs (1961), Autumn Quail (1962), Small Talk on the Nile (1966), and Miramar (1967), Mahfouz turned to surrealist short stories, strange, even unactable plays, and novels explicit in their sociopolitical commentary.
Bradshaw has her moments as Paula but, like Craig, is faced with some almost unactable dialogue in emotional moments.
I mentioned to him that Hazlitt, the early 19th century essayist and theatre critic, declared that Lear was unactable due to the intense horrors heaped upon the old man's head making it almost impossible for an actor to convey such things adequately.
While Eliot complains that the melancholy Dane lacks sufficient motivation for his debilitating hesitance, Auden asserts that the role is purposefully made unactable by the playwright.
Round about this time, too, I was beginning to experience why this role has been described as "unactable." It's really rather like being in two plays - there's the play that goes up to Act 3, Scene 3 - up to then, except for the small problem of Cassio's getting drunk, it feels like being in a love story and that's all, for an hour and 20 minutes.