unactive

unactive

(ʌnˈæktɪv)
adj
1. inactive, listless, or idle
2. lacking employment
vb (tr)
to make (a person) inactive
References in classic literature ?
When ADAM thus to EVE: Fair Consort, th' hour Of night, and all things now retir'd to rest Mind us of like repose, since God hath set Labour and rest, as day and night to men Successive, and the timely dew of sleep Now falling with soft slumbrous weight inclines Our eye-lids; other Creatures all day long Rove idle unimploid, and less need rest; Man hath his daily work of body or mind Appointed, which declares his Dignitie, And the regard of Heav'n on all his waies; While other Animals unactive range, And of thir doings God takes no account.
From Egypt home returned, in Nazareth Hath been our dwelling many years; his life Private, unactive, calm, contemplative, Little suspicious to any king.
"We will always remember Jonah and this page won't be deleted but for now and the immediate future this page will be unactive."
Both sides of the obtained wideband channel have the same number of unactive OFDM carriers, so the frequency guard bands are the same as in case of single channel in accordance to [8].
(8) Across the 1790s, when he was most fully preoccupied by Samson Agonistes, Blake was engaged in redefining what counts as an "action," complicating the relationship between strength and weakness, activity and passivity, in a way he learned from Milton and especially from Milton's Samson, whom a late semichorus in Samson Agonistes describes as "vigorous most / When most unactive deem'd" (1704-5).
(108) On the other hand, the second-person spectator excludes the possibility of external criteria to measure virtue (like computing the quantity of benevolence) because sympathy is no longer an "unactive affection" as Hutcheson had characterized it, (109) but precisely the vehicle to set propriety.
unactive, / Still cupboarding the viand, never bearing / Like labour
(45) Public debt exacerbated divergent interests within the nation, insofar as it facilitated concentration of capital among an urban merchant class that was supported by taxation on the "provinces." (46) Debt inflated prices and taxes; it placed too much authority in the hands of foreign creditors whose allegiance was inconsistent with the interests of Englishmen; and, in a reminder of the biblical admonition to live by the sweat of our labor, (47) it would encourage a "useless and unactive life" by allowing creditors to live idly off the interest of their investments.
According to Adam's exposition, which reads something along the lines of a solidly Protestant work ethic, God, like the master or landowner of the Matthean parables, takes account of prelapsarian humanity, but not of "Animals unactive" (PL IV.621): "Man hath his daily work of body or mind / Appointed, which declares his Dignitie, / And the regard of Heav'n on all his waies" (PL IV.618-20).
By this Management I found an Opportunity to see what a most insignificant, unthinking Life, the poor indolent Wretch, who by his unactive Temper had at first been my Ruin, now liv'd; how he only rose in the Morning, to go to-Bed at Night [...] that he seem'd to be one, who, tho' he was indeed, alive, had no manner of Business in Life, but to stay to be call'd out of it [...] that when he was gone, would leave no Remembrance behind him that ever he was here.
Compromised agency, coded "female," "the primary model of literary heroism" (86) in the Restoration, is the focus of the three late seventeenth-century texts Rose investigates in her last chapter, "'Vigorous most / When most unactive deem'd': Gender and the Heroics of Endurance in Milton's Samson Agonistes, Aphra Behn's Oroonoko, and Mary Astell's Some Reflections upon Marriage." The linking of these three Restoration texts highlights surprising affiliations between Milton and two women writers, especially Astell, whose Royalist and Anglican sympathies differ radically from the poet's Puritanism and anti-monarchism.
LaMotte quotes lines 1699-1705 of Samson Agonistes in speaking of the "self-begotten bird" that "From out her ashy womb now teemed / Revives, reflourishes, then vigorous most / When most unactive deemed" (546).