unadjudicated

unadjudicated

(ˌʌnəˈdʒuːdɪˌkeɪtɪd)
adj
(Law) not adjudicated or judged
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Unadjudicated charges exceed amount reimbursed by payers, and are estimated to range from 40-60%, depending on payer type.
Fortunately, as we will argue below, it is not the only basis for a court's jurisdiction in cases involving alleged violations of the preemptory norms of jus cogens which, if unchecked or unadjudicated, will threaten the entire international legal and social order.
The duty to disclose may extend to uncharged and unadjudicated illegal conduct.
"To the extent the SEC database includes customer complaints and unadjudicated allegations, it will be subject to the same industry pushback as BrokerCheck," Bennett opined.
In most jurisdictions, a party may not impeach a witness by evidence of a criminal conviction, prior inconsistent statements, or unadjudicated perjury unless the witness is actually called to testify, confronted with impeaching information, and provided an opportunity to explain the situation.
Department of Justice reached unadjudicated civil settlements with banks
2014) ("Indeed, absent an express prior disclosure, a corporation has no affirmative duty to speculate or disclose 'uncharged, unadjudicated wrongdoings or mismanagement.' illegal internal policies, or violations of a company's internal codes of conduct and legal policies." (quoting Ciresi v.
Superficially, Simmons appears to support the Fresenius II court's conclusion that an order is not immune from the application of an intervening judgment if any issues remain unadjudicated. However, its precedential value is suspect.
Though Williams involved the use of unadjudicated conduct, the logic of the Court's analysis extended to the use of acquitted conduct as well.
was unadjudicated for the purposes of [section] 2254(d).
Under that rule, the courts of one country will not enforce final tax judgments or unadjudicated tax claims of another [see Brenda Mallinak, "The Revenue Rule: A Common Law Doctrine for the Twenty-First Century," Duke Journal of Comparative and International Law, vol.
The claim is "new" in the sense that there are materially different facts in support of the claim, and it is sufficiently different from the exhausted claim so as to be considered unadjudicated by the state courts.