unadmitted

unadmitted

(ˌʌnədˈmɪtɪd)
adj
1. having been denied entry
2. not acknowledged, admitted, or confessed
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in classic literature ?
The interval had been full of unadmitted tension, which suddenly passed.
SOCRATES: Do you remember how, in the example of figure, we rejected any answer given in terms which were as yet unexplained or unadmitted?
Fetherstonhaugh goes on to invoke the "disciplined spirit of the lion-hearted old veteran" to describe how the decision to fire on the crowd was made only "as a last resort." He has unadmitted bias, and his story has an obvious purpose, a justification of the decision to fire on the crowd (which resulted in 30 casualties and one death).
Local Rule 83.5.3(j) provides that an unadmitted lawyer may sign a complaint, answer or other pleading necessary to prevent the expiration of a statute of limitations or an entry of default, provided that the required motion for pro hac vice admission is filed within seven days.
The edifying June 2017 SCOTUS order isn't hard to follow Start with the premise that an "unadmitted and nonresident alien" has "no constitutional right of entry to this country," then add the concepts about Executive authority being at a "peak when there is no tie between the foreign national and the United States" and national security being "'an urgent objective of the highest order.'"
After he awakens to the thought of his own death in the night air, on the Irish estate where he was conceived, Roderick thinks of his "three fathers--the defeated Victor, the determining Cousin Francis, the unadmitted stepfather Robert: there was a confluence in him, at the moment, of the unequal three" (352).
to which unadmitted noncitizens are protected by the Constitution,
Clinton--as well as admitted socialist Bernie Sanders, unadmitted socialist Barack Obama, and the "global elites," as noted above--all point to the current economic bogeyman.
In Glasmann, the Washington appellate court reversed a conviction for first-degree kidnapping and second-degree assault, finding that the prosecutor violated a defendant's right to a fair trial by displaying PowerPoint slides of photos received in evidence by inappropriately modifying them by adding captions like "Do you believe him" and "Guilty, guilty, guilty." Such slides, which reflected the prosecutor's own personal opinion of the case, "were the equivalent of unadmitted evidence." Glasmann, at 705.
Rahner also wrote of a "despairing involvement" in daily life, mired only in the world and in oneself, with an "unadmitted despair" about life's ultimate meaning (Foundations 33, 48).