unaimed

unaimed

(ʌnˈeɪmd)
adj
not aimed or specifically targeted
References in classic literature ?
And Johnny, the pilot, ere he returned to the service of the Commissioner, received a fair portion of the twenty pounds of head money that Kennan divided among the members of the launch crew who had raced through the jungle to the rescue the day Jerry had taken Makawao by the back of the neck and startled him into pulling the trigger of his unaimed rifle.
Instead, the non-cognitive moves as a temporal stream of unaimed sensuality that does not create appearances of imagination or the world but experiences and is spontaneously inspired by them (the arguments against any confusion of feeling with thought are formulated in: Kirsberg 2018, 262-265; comp.: Kirsberg 2016a, 22-38, 66-68, 118-124, 128-150 etc).
Sen had condemned India's economic growth model for producing 'unaimed opulence,' In his book, An Uncertain Glory co-written with his colleague Jean Dreze, Sen has argued that despite making considerable economic progress, India has been unable to match even Bangladesh, let alone China, in providing adequate education and health facilities to it citizens.
The race is unaimed so that all ages and abilities can participate without undue attention on the competitive aspect of the run, Nemetz said.
He had every prospect of being shot by unaimed fire and spotted by a German patrol or working party, who would have soon made short work of him.
The fact eye movement slope is significantly different in aimed and unaimed tasks, shows we decided correctly to indicate motivated tasks if the gamma brainwave increase is more than 2 Hz.
The remaining three fingers exert a slight rearward pressure to ensure that the buttstock remains in the pocket of the shoulder." (108) Moreover, "unaimed fire must never be tolerated...." (109) "Keep the cheek on the stock for every shot, align the firing eye with the rear aperture, and focus on the front sightpost." (110) The manual does not teach soldiers to "spray fire from the hip."
At about 8 a.m., a group of vehicles with mounted machine guns surrounded the team site; the occupants were shooting unaimed shots into the air.
In 1916, Frederick Lanchester, a British mathematician, sought to apply two equations--the law of squares to '"aimed fire' (e.g., tank versus tank) and the linear law to 'unaimed fire' (e.g., artillery barraging an area without precise knowledge of target locations)." (19) As is the case with many simulations, Lanchester's equations failed to consider qualitative factors, such as "the effects of terrain or the differences in competence between equally sized and equipped forces of different nations." (20) This tendency to avoid qualitative inputs or, worse, mask them as seemingly numerically weighted (i.e., quantitative) data sets is an example of what has proved to be a recurring problem throughout the history of linear deductive thinking.
He recommends a no first use policy, outlawing unaimed weapons, and mandating weapons that self-destruct at the end of hostilities.
(9) Cyber expert Bruce Schneier warns that time is running out to put in place a cyber treaty that could, he advocates, "stipulate a no first use policy, outlaw unaimed weapons, or mandate weapons that self-destruct at the end of hostilities." (10)
NS always achieves its adaptive goals, as an unaimed arrow never misses.