unalerted

unalerted

(ˌʌnəˈlɜːtɪd)
adj
not alerted
References in periodicals archive ?
A country may want to sneak in for a picture or close look of a ground or space target in its unalerted and unconcealed state.
Taoka, "Break reaction times of unalerted drivers," ITE Journal, vol.
(50.) Such international and regional protocols include the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea (COLREGS), Military Maritime Consultative Agreement (MMCA), Western Pacific Naval Symposium (WPNS), Code for Unalerted Encounters at Sea (CUES), International Code of Signals, United Nations Convention on Law of the Sea (UNCLOS), and the International Civil Aviation Organization Rules of the Air (ICAO).
By this point of the game, I was longing for a close-range shot at an unalerted deer, and thus, as I built a meager blind of rock and brush, I was praying this new approach would pay off.
(33) It started life as the Code for Unalerted Encounters at Sea, initially presented at a WPNS Workshop in South Korea in April 1998 and later endorsed by the WPNS Chiefs of Navy for voluntary adoption by WPNS member navies and any other navy.
Existing agreements such as the 1972 Convention on the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea (COLREGs), the multilateral Code for Unalerted Encounters at Sea (CUES), and the 1998 bilateral U.S.-Chinese Military Maritime Consultative Agreement (MMCA) provide a framework for continued engagement.
In September 2012, even as a plenary meeting of the MMCA was held, the PLAN blocked adoption of a Code for Unalerted Encounters at Sea (CUES) at the Western Pacific Naval Symposium (WPNS) in Malaysia.
A number of years ago, the Western Pacific Naval Symposium developed a voluntary Code for Unalerted Encounters at Sea.
The RSN uses the Codes for Unalerted Encounters at Sea, under the WPNS rubric.
To be effective, a back-up warning system must capture the attention of an unalerted driver and provide sufficient advance notice to enable drivers to respond appropriately.
All subjects were advised that they would be subjected to a minor acceleration event, but were randomly assigned to one of three groups: alerted, unalerted, or surprised.