unalive

unalive

(ˌʌnəˈlaɪv)
adj
1. not aware of something
2. lacking vigour; not alive
References in periodicals archive ?
(D'Annunzio, 1995: 167-168) Here, multiple discourses relating to death, the woman, and her image are in play, but throughout the entire passage, Claudio notes how his desire to turn the living Massimilla into an unalive body is related to an aesthetic project.
The connection between the necrophilia of the Umbelino and Pantea story and its echoes in Claudio's response to Massimilla and Violante thus links to the prologue through this game of identification and internalization that relies upon making the women unalive. By setting up the entire novel as an exploration of art's potential to transform experience, Claudio undergoes the irresistible desire to ventriloquize these women who are both real and creatures of his bewildered desire.
This 'lack of synchronic sound renders it a ghostly world in which the figures seem unalive, even before they are killed.
I want them to bore holes through the half-a-minds of the unalive. In other words, I don't wanna send ya crapola.
The same clay body in Crowe's kiln looks pretty dark and unalive. For Crowe's kiln, in the clay body I use much more kaolin, less grog and increase the flux a little and it responds much better to his firing.
Under the influence or not, Williams seems somehow unalive, unaware of how to make prose sing, or people breathe.
One of the hidden epigraphs to Balcony, by Edmund Husserl, provides an indication of intent: This world now present to me, and every waking "now" obviously so, has its temporal horizon, infinite in both directions, its known and unknown, its intimately alive and its unalive past and future.
I found the length of my arm of a card catalogue on the topic "nithe neamhbheo agus neacha nach bhfuil ann" ("unalive beings and things that don't exist").
His open eyes were unalive, mere kernels of muscle, though I still found myself poised vertiginously on their edge, falling through these dead holes deeper into the empty hulk he had become, as if his spirit had flown and mine was being sucked there in its place" (122-23).
The editors found the novel to contain worlds lacking in breadth, depth, and width, and the characters to be wooden and unalive. They objected to the obsessive repetitions, insertions, and lists, commenting on the splintered and tentative narrative and accusing the would-be novel of being merely "a lengthy combining of separate things" and a "collection of bits and pieces." They objected to the shallowness and incoherence and to the strange syntax and cliched style.
Newman is ashamed that Parkes for her more recent book has also been treated to rudeness from anonymous male writers "who seem to imagine that she is bent on unsexing women, or is unalive to the essential necessity of some feminine virtues" (168), for she is not an extremist and is "more solid, more sensible, more bent on the real welfare of her sex than the men who talk high of the refined and beautiful accomplishments" they demand of women, reckless of the widespread misery that the universal striving after them entails.
become unalive. "Bracket," the new condition that prevents his