unambivalently

unambivalently

(ˌʌnæmˈbɪvələntlɪ)
adv
in an unambivalent or clear manner
References in periodicals archive ?
While in the latter category narrative blame is pinned quite unambivalently on the central character, in the former group the victim is innocent.
It is worth noting that in recounting these early incidents, Aciman unambivalently identifies himself as a "European" Jewish boy, already set apart from his Arab peers.
Very much like minority returnees, they do not integrate unambivalently in their new settlements, in spite of the fact that their settlement occurs in their "national homeland." (46) While minority returnees cannot simply regain lost homes because they come back to what are radically transformed surroundings (destroyed property, economic problems, changes in politics, etc.), those integrating in the country of asylum, even though it is controlled by their nationals, have come to completely new surroundings, in which their predicaments might be worse than those of returnees.
In Chronicle of a Summer, no one is unambivalently happy.
These are based in well-known conventions, so that the characters they portray are unambivalently identifiable.
Faced with this after-effect, the reader cannot unambivalently identify with Samson's open eye.
Davis also notes that until Charlotte began to cultivate a serious relationship with Houghton Gilman, her "most unambivalently passionate and enduring relationships" had been with women (p.
However, these positive feelings have a number of origins reflecting a variety of psychic processes, including some that are unambivalently pleasurable experiences and others that mask more negative or ambivalent feelings.
They never laugh at a plump girl, even if she overdoes it a little." (168) Despite the increase of normative pressure of the new slender body ideal that was promoted now in fashion magazines and beauty manuals, the messages about slenderness in women were still conflicted, while diet literature from and for men depicted slenderness and dieting as unambivalently positive.
Next to birth, wealth was the most important attribute remarked upon in early modern works, though it too was not seen as unambivalently positive.
However, Chuck valued being the sort of person who does as he pleases and who unambivalently rejects conventional morality....