unargued

unargued

(ʌnˈɑːɡjuːd)
adj
1. not debated
2. not debated against or disputed
3. not censured or disapproved of

un•ar•gued

(ʌnˈɑr gyud)

adj.
1. not subject to argument or discussion; undisputed.
2. unopposed by argument; undebated.
[1610–20]
Translations

unargued

adj (= without argumentation)unbegründet; (= undisputed)unangefochten, unbestritten; the point was left unargueddieser Punkt wurde nicht begründet; (= undiscussed)dieser Punkt wurde nicht erörtert
References in periodicals archive ?
opinion (32) and unargued in the original merits briefs.
In what follows, I will suggest that Waldron's Third Absolutist Claim suffers three defects: it is substantially unargued, unduly agency-denying, and normatively suspect.
Like many other recent reports on the topic, this one starts from unargued -- and largely unwarranted -- assumptions and arrives at anodyne conclusions.
"We were thus deprived of the opportunity to consider, and settle, a controverted question of law that has divided the Circuits, and were invited instead to decide an ADA question that has relevance only if we assume the Ninth Circuit correctly resolved the antecedent, unargued question on which we granted certiorari." Sheehan, 135 S.Ct.1765 at 1779 (Scalia, J., concurring in part and dissenting in part).
It is a modern conceit that pre-modern European governments rested on an unargued right to rule alleged to come from God or the mere fact of conquest, without reference to popular will.
Nicholls writes, "Conceptual breakthrough can best be understood in terms of 'paradigms' [...]" where "paradigm" designates a "way of looking at and interpreting the world" and "consists of a set of often unspoken and unargued assumptions" (Clute and Nicholls 255).
I believe that there is at least one good reason why the above should not be thought of as an unargued presupposition.
Cynicism can be ad hoc, unargued, unsubstantiated, ungenerous, anti-social, and lacking in the kind of self-reflection that undergirds philosophical irony.
are unargued, ungrounded in a narrative of reception that might give them explanatory force" (Doom, p.
It is easy to spot unargued assumptions in this passage from the Harvard report, and several of its claims could reasonably be disputed.
The unargued claim that manipulated wants are themselves imposed costs seems false.