unartistic


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Related to unartistic: inartistic

unartistic

(ˌʌnɑːˈtɪstɪk)
adj
lacking artistic sensibilities; not artistic
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.unartistic - lacking aesthetic sensibilityunartistic - lacking aesthetic sensibility;  
inaesthetic, unaesthetic - violating aesthetic canons or requirements; deficient in tastefulness or beauty; "inaesthetic and quite unintellectual"; "peered through those inaesthetic spectacles"
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The Hall was a queer place, I thought, with higher pews in it than a church - and with people hanging over the pews looking on - and with mighty Justices (one with a powdered head) leaning back in chairs, with folded arms, or taking snuff, or going to sleep, or writing, or reading the newspapers - and with some shining black portraits on the walls, which my unartistic eye regarded as a composition of hardbake and sticking-plaister.
Thus the much talked about giant-sized Statue of Unity will perhaps be remembered, in our otherwise glorious past history of art, as an unartistic pygmy due to its ill proportioned bodily divisions.
Choy also provides six simple story pictures that even the unartistic can master.
Current job descriptions are candid about this decidedly unartistic job responsibility.
She and her Canadian diplomat husband transferred there after a posting in Brazil, and her first accounts of the nation are blunt: she finds it gray, unartistic, somewhat backward, and writes that the nights are black and ceaseless.
The proper response to this recognition is gratitude and humility, two rare dispositions in our confused and unartistic age, but the necessary route to wisdom.
We would not tell the above professor that his sum is unartistic, or immoral, or that it is a breach of libertarianism, but that it is mathematically incorrect.
In Nietzsche's view, if the Apollonian and Dionysian tendencies are not properly related to one another, then the individual becomes "egoistic" and "unartistic." Such a subject--i.e., the striving individual bent on furthering his own egoistic purposes--can be thought of "only as an enemy to art, never as its source." Indeed, it should be stressed here that, contrary to what is often assumed about Nietzsche, genuinely artistic creation is always a selfless or "egoless" activity.
In the case of the "Jumping Frog," he asserts that the classical precedent was unrelated and that his actual source material was an unembellished factual account from a completely unartistic oral historian in a mining camp.
Friedman's extraordinary knack for coaxing apparently unartistic matter into unanticipated artistic substance was here extended (reduced?) to making things that looked like Artworks.
Also "there is no reason why a man who was mutilated in body through a courageous action on the field of battle should have that result perpetuated on canvas in most realistic and unartistic fashion.