unassimilated

unassimilated

(ˌʌnəˈsɪmɪleɪtɪd)
adj
1. not adjusted or brought into harmony
2. not absorbed and incorporated
3. (Physiology) physiol not absorbed and incorporated into bodily tissues
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References in periodicals archive ?
Large unassimilated populations in the West with different languages and cultures are proof of absence of a 'genuine link'.
These countries have 'arrested developments,' remaining LDCs with unassimilated minorities.
In all these empires, the mix of indigenous peoples, European-origin populations, slaves and indentured workers, immigrants, and unassimilated social groups led to unequal and hierarchical political relations.
Our Puritan fear of the love of things turns out to have been groundless after all, for we do not love things or even possess them: they pass through our lives as barium passes through the digestive tract, unassimilated, their function merely to flash signals along the way."
[5] Unless there is understanding, students may only commit unassimilated data to short-term memory and no meaningful learning will occur.
Attorney General Jeff Sessions has argued that the 1965 law led to a problematic explosion of "unassimilated" immigrants.
Less security adept and savvy nations with populations containing unassimilated and un-integrated ethnic minorities with uncertain allegiances to the host nation's ethos, laws, governing bodies and language have particularly challenging internal security dilemmas.
The long-standing political problems in contemporary France--unsolved economic weaknesses, terrorist attacks, unassimilated immigration, uncertain moral and civic education, and mutual distrust between the elites and the people--won't disappear overnight.
If there were such a wave, France - with a sluggish economy, a large population of unassimilated immigrants and a recent history of Europe's most vicious terrorist attacks - could expect to be inundated by it.
The dialogues with her "unassimilated, and often dissatisfied customers" (68) transcend the binary situation--us/them--in Lazarus's poem to present a much bleaker and complicated reality.
In order to remind us that we are reading from an unassimilated point of view--that is, from the point of view of an Anglo-Saxon who has refused to incorporate French--Kingsnorth has restricted himself, wherever possible, to the words, sounds, punctuation, and orthography of pre-conquest England.