unassuageable

unassuageable

(ˌʌnəˈsweɪdʒəbəl)
adj
not able to be assuaged or relieved
References in periodicals archive ?
In terms of the aftermath, Thomas wrote: "The people of Aberfan were left not only with their unassuageable grief, but also with the threatening shadow of the remains of the tips that loomed above their village on the mountainside.
In effect, some criticism paints Rhys's novels as a "stereotyped portrait of 'woman fallen into prostitution because she is the victim of her own unassuageable desires" (1).
For American Jews, the problem of the "ordinary German" is especially troubling, because it brings us directly to the darkest, most unassuageable suspicions about Jewish vulnerability.
It was her secret indulgence, meant to quench the unassuageable pangs of desire, and here she was discovering a far, far better means for filling that void.
Vampires too, which embody the unassuageable appetite of the undead who batten on and infect the living, constitute a category crisis reflecting cultural anxieties.
How "dear" is his obtuse refusal to see her side of grief, to deny her irrational need to look back at their loss, her panic to abandon him and his ways, her unassuageable desperation to join another in her grief?
Schoeck notes that envy of others is by its nature always "an unassuageable, negative unproductive feeling," and that successful cultures inhibit envy.
Shelley's letters--meant, she informs her father, to eliminate a shared history of unassuageable longing and destructive love--may be understood to serve a similar purpose.
That entwining of effects pierces to the centre of Wordsworthian elegy, with its mixture of consolation and unassuageable loss.
fear, grievous loss, unassuageable anxiety, and looming threat?
As Jude McCulloch notes here, the manufacture of pervasive and unassuageable fear is the means by which actually existing democracy would be shut down in the West, and a permanently mobilised society created.