unbending

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un·bend·ing

 (ŭn-bĕn′dĭng)
adj.
1. Not yielding; inflexible: an unbending will to dominate.
2. Aloof and often antisocial; extremely reserved: an unbending manner.

un·bend′ing·ly adv.

unbending

(ʌnˈbɛndɪŋ)
adj
1. rigid or inflexible
2. characterized by sternness or severity: an unbending rule.
unˈbendingly adv
unˈbendingness n

un•bend•ing

(ʌnˈbɛn dɪŋ)

adj.
1. not bending; inflexible; rigid.
2. refusing to yield or compromise; resolute.
3. austere or formal; aloof.
[1545–55]
un•bend′ing•ly, adv.
un•bend′ing•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.unbending - incapable of adapting or changing to meet circumstancesunbending - incapable of adapting or changing to meet circumstances; "a rigid disciplinarian"; "an inflexible law"; "an unbending will to dominate"
unadaptable - not adaptable

unbending

adjective inflexible, strict, rigid, firm, tough, severe, stubborn, hardline, uncompromising, resolute, intractable, unyielding her unbending opposition to the old regime

unbending

adjective
1. Not changing shape or bending:
3. Indicating or possessing determination, resolution, or persistence:
Translations

unbending

[ˈʌnˈbendɪŋ] ADJinflexible, rígido (fig) [person, attitude] → inflexible; (= strict) → estricto, severo

unbending

[ˌʌnˈbɛndɪŋ] adj [person, attitude, character] → inflexible

unbending

adj person, attitudeunnachgiebig; determinationunbeugsam; commitmentunerschütterlich

unbending

[ʌnˈbɛndɪŋ] adj (fig) → inflessibile, rigido/a
References in periodicals archive ?
At worst, the reaction smacks of timidity and opportunism cloaked as stern headmaster-ish unbendingness in the cause of upholding decent schoolboy conduct.
Then at last I stand by my own stubborn guns, for somewhere in me is the last unbendingness which must have its way." And when I laughed and said I had written something of this sort in my paper, and spoke of Grant as of similar habit, he assented, "Yes, I have heard it of Grant, too--and how much it explains which would otherwise be inexplicable!" (WWC, 7:253)
"What struck people's minds above all else," Livy, the great Roman, wrote in his History on Brutus' sacrifice of his own sons for the good of the Republic, "is that his function as consul imposed on the father the task of punishing his sons, and that his unbendingness compelled him personally to order the execution, the very sight of which was not spared him." In Guerin's rendering of the scene, the hero turns away but does not blanch.