unbenefited

unbenefited

(ʌnˈbɛnɪfɪtɪd) or

unbenefitted

adj
(of a job) not accompanied by benefits such as paid leave or medical insurance
References in classic literature ?
In less than two minutes it was all over--and Samuel (unbenefited by what I might have said) had gone downstairs again.
Unanimously approved, after some discussion, was the hiring of Kenya Morse as an in-training head cook, Leianka Burwell as summer program assistant and Marquez Lilly as after-school prep assistant, all at $9 an hour, unbenefited, for 30 hours a week until the end of summer.
Key strategies employed by the healthcare industry to provide appropriate nurse staffing levels include the use of contracted labor, flexible unbenefited positions, and both mandatory and voluntary overtime (Lobo, Fisher, Peachey, Ploeg, & Akhtar-Danesh, 2015).
From nonprofit organizations that ask workers to table labor concerns in the name of "the cause" to the expectation that workers in creative professions accept the conditions of precarious, unbenefited, and underpaid work in the name of art, we see that a focus on higher calling over labor has overwhelmingly negative effects on workers.
Penn Central cited Mahon for the proposition that "[g]overnment hardly could go on if to some extent values incident to property could not be diminished without paying for every such change in the general law...." (262) Dismissing the terminal owner's argument that New York City's Landmarks Law effected a taking because it imposes a disproportionate burden on the owners of historic buildings, the Court observed that "[l]egislation designed to promote the general welfare commonly burdens some more than others." (263) The Court then explained that the owner had not been "solely burdened and unbenefited," invoking the reciprocity of advantage doctrine: "[T]he New York City law applies to vast numbers of structures in the city in addition to the Terminal....