unbodied


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un·bod·ied

 (ŭn-bŏd′ēd)
adj.
1. Having no body or form; incorporeal.
2. Being disembodied.

unbodied

(ʌnˈbɒdɪd)
adj
1. (of a spirit or soul) having no body; removed from a body; disembodied
2. not having a physical form; incorporeal; insubstantial

un•bod•ied

(ʌnˈbɒd id)

adj.
1. incorporeal; disembodied.
2. formless; shapeless.
[1505–15]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.unbodied - having no bodyunbodied - having no body      
incorporeal, immaterial - without material form or substance; "an incorporeal spirit"
bodied - having a body or a body of a specified kind; often used in combination; "strong-bodied"; "big-bodied"
2.unbodied - not having a material bodyunbodied - not having a material body; "bodiless ghosts"
incorporeal, immaterial - without material form or substance; "an incorporeal spirit"

unbodied

adjective
References in classic literature ?
what shall be grand in thee, it must needs be plucked at from the skies, and dived for in the deep, and featured in the unbodied air!
Somewhat after evoking this phallus, the speaker alludes to a similarly unattached vagina when he says, "Full nakedness, all joyes are due to thee; / As Soules unbodied, bodyes uncloth'd must bee / To tast whole joyes" (33-35).
On the basis of viscosity and iodine value dehydrated castor oil is categorised in two main types, termed as unbodied and bodied.
Written on the banks of the Arun, October 1785," in which the poetess visually glimpses the unbodied Otway.
Or it follows the interiority of point-of-view editing (and modulations of focus) through an unbodied consciousness that seethes from the objects and cinematic spaces themselves.
Its fea may either be summoned to the Halls of Mandos, or it may wander unbodied as a wraith.
If it is possible to leave the body in dream, or in death, perhaps it is possible to leave the body forever, to wander endlessly unbodied, unhooked, a nameless identity, or an unidentified name, a soul unattached, indifferent to everything, a soul immortal, perhaps incorruptible, like God--who can say?
Rather, "What shall be grand in thee," wrote Melville searching his far-flung waters of memory, "must needs be plucked at from the skies, and dived for in the deep, and featured in the unbodied air.