unbookish

unbookish

(ʌnˈbʊkɪʃ)
adj
not studious or bookish
References in periodicals archive ?
Sapronov convinced Dune and his comrades by speaking 'in plain, unbookish language' and avoiding 'revolutionary jargon'.
If you are going to join humanity on a Wednesday you'd better pick either an unbookish family or a non-English speaking one.
(ii) IAGO: As he shall smile, Othello shall go mad; / And his unbookish jealousy must conster / Poor Cassio's smiles ...
And his unbookish jealousy must construe / Poor Cassio's smiles,
In fact, it's the opposite of critical interpretation, because there's no interest in the degree to which suburban life is a mixture of chosen and unchosen circumstance--there is simply a disdain for the people who live there and their allegedly unbookish ways (another error: book reading is higher per capita in Australia than the UK, whatever importance one may place on that as a measure of the good life).
It is hard to imagine how, despite his employment in the Bank of England, one could refer to the "unbookish" occupations of Browning's father (p.
By profession he was an antiquarian book dealer and yet seems utterly unbookish and not in the least "literary."
As an amateur in the best sense of that much misunderstood word, she succeeds in communicating a delighted fascination with things Acehnese to an audience which, it seems safe to suppose, is literate but decidedly unbookish, craving information that is capable of being consumed at a sitting.