unborrowed

Related to unborrowed: borrowed time

unborrowed

(ʌnˈbɒrəʊd)
adj
not borrowed
References in classic literature ?
The whole song possessed the nameless charm peculiar to unborrowed thought, but four continually-recurring lines shone out from the rest like the blaze of the hearth whose joys they celebrated.
For most of us, no significant life event ever goes "unborrowed", and it's often said milestones in family life can be charted through a quick glance at someone's Credit Union book.
There are rewarding reasons for re-visiting this picturebook many times and it is doubtful that it will sit unborrowed on a bookshelf for very long.
We start from scratch, step by step, sift between borrowed and unborrowed conceptions, tropes and structures, and look for the real sources of our ideas, tracing our conceptual, emotional, historical journeys.
(195.) E.g., Temperate, Unborrowed Animadversions, on the Pamphlet lately Published by Richard Bishop of Cloyne, on the Subject of Tythes 17 (Dublin, J.
the tall rock, The mountain, and the deep and gloomy wood, Their colours and their forms, were then to me An appetite: a feeling and a love, That had no need of a remoter charm, By thought supplied, or any interest Unborrowed from the eye.--That time is past, And all its aching joys are now no more, And all its dizzy raptures.
Negative deposit rates means that banks will now be charged for leaving money unborrowed. The ECB are hoping that the new measures will entice banks to lend more, leading to an overall increase in inflation.
In itself of course this method of historical research and writing is perfectly legitimate, and Brown showers his readers with an enormous range of unborrowed erudition and a large number of stimulating ideas and apercus on specific issues, situations and writers.
Equity represents funding with unborrowed money and more equity means that losses can be absorbed without leading to distress or insolvency.
With everybody saving and nobody borrowing, even with record-low interest rates, the economy enters a deflationary spiral now known as balance sheet recession as it continuously loses aggregate demand equivalent to the unborrowed savings.