unbreech

unbreech

(ʌnˈbriːtʃ)
vb (tr)
1. (Clothing & Fashion) to remove the breeches from (a person)
2. (Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery) archaic to remove a breech from (a cannon)
References in classic literature ?
When our shipmates wondered at this, Toby exclaimed in his odd grave way that the rest might do, as they liked, but that he for one preserved his go-ashore traps for the Spanish main, where the tie of a sailor's neckerchief might make some difference; but as for a parcel of unbreeched heathen, he wouldn't go to the bottom of his chest for any of them, and was half disposed to appear among them in buff himself.
The next moment he was as ready for sport as any unbreeched infant: far readier than the Collector's junior clerk, who at nineteen years was much the elder and graver man of the two.
A hush came over their mirth the moment they beheld him, and they stood whispering to each other while he drew nigh; but, all at once, the devil of their fathers entered into the unbreeched fanatics, and sending up a fierce, shrill cry, they rushed upon the poor Quaker child.
I have a Savage 24V Series B in my shop with barrels that cannot be unbreeched. Someone before me has attempted to unbreech it by prying on the yoke from inside of the receiver that attaches to the locking plunger.
Benfield had possession, but they struggled to make inroads into a Vics defence that had remained unbreeched in the Vase this season.
Looking on the lines Of my boy's face, methoughts I did recoil Twenty-three years and saw myself unbreeched, In my green velvet coat...